Make your own Pi HAT

Make your own Pi HAT

HATs first arrived with the launch of the Raspberry Pi Model B+ in 2014. Since then, there have been some amazing and wonderful HATs, many of which have featured in previous issues of The MagPi: theUnicorn HAT, Piano HAT, Sense HAT, and Explorer HAT. Officially, HAT stands for ‘Hardware Attached on Top,’ although your expert suspects that the acronym came after the name. What else would you call a…
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Sniffur – dog tracker

Sniffur – dog tracker

We love animals here at The MagPi, so when we heard about a Raspberry Pi dog-tracker called ‘Sniffur’, we had to learn more. Sniffur uses tracking technology called ‘beacons’; these are relatively new devices being placed in department stores to track the precise location of customers. The full article can be found in The MagPi 42 and was written by Lucy Hattersley Sniffur flips this idea on its h…
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LCD Control Case review

LCD Control Case review

We reviewed the SPI-Box from SB Components recently, a custom case for the Raspberry Pi 2 and B+ (although it would probably fit a Pi 3 just fine) that allows for a motion sensor and a Pi Camera Module to poke out of the case. With the bundled software, this means you have a functional and cheap security camera, with plenty of software bells and whistles to make it genuinely useful. Using a simila…
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Tweet from Raspberry Pi with Wolfram

Tweet from Raspberry Pi with Wolfram

The Wolfram Language is a powerful knowledge-based language that makes computation accessible to everyone, and is an easy language to dip your toes into as a first-time programmer. To send tweets from Twitter on your Raspberry Pi, all you need is a single function. We’ll be using SendMessage, which is a multipurpose function in the Wolfram Language that gives Raspberry Pi users the ability to seam…
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Strato Pi makes Raspberry Pi more professional

Strato Pi makes Raspberry Pi more professional

At the launch event for the Raspberry Pi 3, Eben Upton revealed that there were plenty of industry customers for the Raspberry Pi, making up a significant percentage of those who have contributed to the eight million total of Raspberry Pis sold. Recently, Sfera Labs has launched a new line of Raspberry Pi add-on boards called Strato Pi designed for the professional applications these Pis are being…
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Location-tracking mountain model project

Location-tracking mountain model project

An LED lights up on a scale model placed on a kitchen counter in Washington State, USA, to signify that over 9,000 miles away in Tanzania, Kurt Hunter has reached the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. Climbing Africa’s highest peak had been a long-held ambition for Kurt. “Ever since moving to Seattle 20 years ago, I would look up at Mount Rainier and dream of climbing it,” he tells us. “After getting m…
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Ubuntu Pi Flavour Maker review

Ubuntu Pi Flavour Maker review

If you’ve been following Raspberry Pi long enough, you may know that early on in its life there was a call for Ubuntu to be used as an operating system for it. As one of, if not the most popular, version of Linux for home users, this distro was wanted by many seeking something familiar for their new tiny computer. It never came to be. However, as Ubuntu is based on Debian, Raspbian was basically t…
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Build a binary clock

Build a binary clock

This is a very simple project to make. In fact, all you really need to do is plug the Sense or Unicorn HAT onto the Raspberry Pi’s GPIO header and install the software. This project displays the current time in binary. The rows of the display are (from top to bottom) the last two digits of the year (e.g. 15), the month number, the day of the month, the hour (24-hour format), the minute, the second…
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The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book out now!

The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book out now!

When we finally went to print and into brick and mortar stores around the globe, we had many emails and messages from people that wanted to see the first five issues from the re-design in physical form so they could complete their extensive MagPi collections. So this got us thinking; instead of releasing each individual issue, we should do one big collection of all the best stuff from those issues. The result is the Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book. This image doesn’t do it justice, but the cover is lovely and glossy With 200 pages of projects in one place, not only can you complete your collection of MagPi content but you can also get an excellent Christmas gift for people wanting to get stuck in with their Raspberry Pi! There are tutorials on how to get started with the Raspberry Pi, guides on how to use the Pi, loads of inspirational projects from around the community and reviews from our experts. You can find the book right now in stores (look in the magazine racks next to The MagPi!), online at the Swag Store and you can also download it to your Android or iOS device via out apps. The post The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book out now! appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
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Time-lapse photography

Time-lapse photography

Time-lapse photography reveals exciting things about the world which you wouldn’t otherwise be able see. Things that happen too slowly for us to perceive: bread rising and plants growing; the clouds, sun, moon, and stars crossing the sky; shadows moving across the land. In this tutorial, we’ll be making a Raspbian-based device that lets you watch things that are too slow to observe with the naked eye. To do this, we will capture lots of still photographs and combine these frames into a video with FFmpeg/libav, which can then be accessed via a web browser. The full article can be found in The MagPi 39 and was written by James Singleton You’ll need Raspberry Pi Camera Module STEP-01 Connect the Camera Module First, connect the camera module to the Raspberry Pi with the included ribbon cable. Locate the correct socket; it’s on the top of the Raspberry Pi circuit board and is the one furthest away from the micro-USB power connector. The socket is handily labelled ‘CAMERA’ on the newer Raspberry Pi models. Lift up the outside of the socket to release the clamp, then insert the ribbon cable with the metal contacts facing towards the micro-USB power connector. Finally, hold the ribbon cable in position and push the outside of the socket back down to clamp the cable in place. STEP-02 Enable and test the camera Power the Raspberry Pi up. You now have a choice: boot to the command line, open a terminal window, or establish a secure shell (SSH) connection. Enable the camera by running this command from a terminal to launch the Raspberry Pi configuration tool:$sud†o raspi-configThen select the ‘Enable Camera’ option. You can test the camera by running the following command:raspistill -o testimage.jpgThe red LED on the camera module should light up for 5 seconds and a JPEG image will be saved to the current directory. If the camera is mounted upside down, then you can use the vertical and horizontal flip command-line switches (-vf and -hf). STEP-03 Install and configure software Install a web server to access your images remotely. Run this command to install Apache:$ su†do apt-get install apacŠhe2Remove the default page to see the contents of the directory:$ sud†o rm /var/www™™™/in†dex.hŠtmlVisit the IP address of your Pi (e.g. http://192.168.1.45 – you can find this by using ifconfig) and you should see an empty directory listing. If you run the following command and…
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