Comedy Legend Carl Reiner Dies At 98

Comedy Legend Carl Reiner Dies At 98

Carl Reiner, whose best known comedy credits easily run many miles long and includes forming a duo with the madcap Mel Brooks, died Monday in his Beverly Hills home of natural causes. He was 98.As a writer and director, Reiner was instrumental in the creation of the genre-defining ’60s sitcom The Dick Van Dyke Show, which in turn was inspired by his experiences as a writer and actor on Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows and Caesar’s Hour. Reiner also collaborated with Steven Martin on many of his films, including directing 1979’s highly revered The Jerk.Reiner’s acting career stretches even further up until very recently. In 2019, he voiced Carl Reineroceros in Toy Story 4, and going back he has co-starred in three Ocean’s Eleven films and guest starred on The Larry Sanders Show, Family Guy, and Parks and Recreation.Continue Reading at GameSpot
Source: Comedy Legend Carl Reiner Dies At 98

Gran Turismo Partners With Getty Images For Licensed Photos Inside The Game

Gran Turismo Partners With Getty Images For Licensed Photos Inside The Game

Following the announcement of Gran Turismo 7 during the PlayStation 5 showcase in June, Sony has announced a unique and interesting promotion surrounding an earlier entry in the racing franchise.Developer Polyphony Digital has agreed to a partnership with Getty Images that will see Getty’s motorsport photographers take in-game photos of Gran Turismo Sport’s online events. Continue Reading at GameSpot
Source: Gran Turismo Partners With Getty Images For Licensed Photos Inside The Game

Trackmania Review

Trackmania Review

Some games not only stand the test of time, they actively defy it. That’s undoubtedly the case for Trackmania’s over-the-top time trials and deep track editor – a simple but addictive combination that’s earned the series a dedicated community for nearly two decades. The latest entry, a remake of 2006’s TrackMania Nations simply called Trackmania, feels like a return to form in many ways. But an off-putting subscription system and poor tools to actually teach you its intricacies make it a bittersweet reunion. While there’s plenty of racing in Trackmania, the main event has always been variations on time trials. Whether you’re playing alone or against others online, you’re always really competing against your own skills. This can make a lot of Trackmania’s modes feel repetitive, whether its Time Attack, the team multiplayer of Chase or the traditional circuit-based Lap. But that drive to master a track is more than enough reason to keep coming back. [widget path=”global/article/imagegallery” parameters=”albumSlug=8-trackmania-gameplay-screenshots&captions=true”] Unfortunately, Trackmania has never explained itself particularly well, and 2020’s rendition is no different. An all too brief tutorial covers the basics, but you’re on your own when it comes to learning the mechanical subtlety behind getting truly fast times – tricks like nudging the jetpack-like reactor boost in midair to hover through midair checkpoints you didn’t see coming. That gives Trackmania a steeper learning curve than it ought to have. But once you zoom past those initial speed bumps, Trackmania can be hard to put down. Finishing any of its decent launch selection of 45+ official tracks can take less than 90 seconds a piece, but you’ll want to play them over and over to shave off seconds and find all the clever shortcuts hidden in plain sight. The potent sounds of your engine roaring backed by high energy music can even eventually become quite soothing, drawing you in as you boost, jump, and drift around each corner in perfect rhythm. [poilib element=”quoteBox” parameters=”excerpt=It%20feels%20like%20you%E2%80%99re%20perpetually%20on%20the%20edge%20of%20losing%20control%2C%20making%20good%20runs%20exhilarating.”] That doesn’t mean that you’ll be calmly cruising to the finish line though. Trackmania’s cars always feel floaty around turns, and you often pick up speed faster than you think you should. That may sound like a bad thing, but it actually contributes to the feeling that you’re perpetually just on the edge of losing control, which makes it all the more exhilarating when you dial things in just right and hit the goal for a…
Source: Trackmania Review

Ghost Of Tsushima: Here's When Reviews Go Live

Ghost Of Tsushima: Here's When Reviews Go Live

With July just around the corner now, less than a month remains until Ghost of Tsushima hits PS4. The highly anticipated exclusive launches on Friday, July 17, and now we know exactly when reviews for the game will go live.The review embargo for Ghost of Tsushima is Tuesday, July 14 at 7 AM PT / 10 AM ET / 3 PM BST. That means that in two weeks you’ll begin seeing outlets–including GameSpot–publishing their reviews of the game ahead of its release.Ghost of Tsushima is an open-world action game developed by Sucker Punch, the studio behind the Sly Cooper and Infamous franchises. The title features only one playable character, Jin Sakai, who is fighting to reclaim his home island from the invading Mongols. Throughout the story, players will have the choice to face their foes as an honorable samurai or become the “Ghost” and use stealth and other deceitful tactics.Continue Reading at GameSpot
Source: Ghost Of Tsushima: Here's When Reviews Go Live

Xbox One's Best Deals This Week: Horror Games, Expansions, And More

Xbox One's Best Deals This Week: Horror Games, Expansions, And More

If you like your games to be filled with monsters, this week’s deals on the Xbox Store are for you. A new sale dubbed Shocktober in Summer offers 75% off horror and action games for Xbox One, including Telltale’s The Walking Dead, Dead Rising, and Devil May Cry. There’s also a sale on add-ons for popular games such as The Division 2 and Grand Theft Auto V. Like usual, Xbox Live Gold subscribers get exclusive deals, and this week’s Deals With Gold games are definitely worth checking out. The Xbox Store’s current batch of deals are live through July 6.While last year’s Devil May Cry 5 isn’t featured in the sale, every other game in Capcom’s stylish action franchise is steeply discounted. You can grab the Devil May Cry HD Collection–containing the first three games–for $18 and Devil May Cry 4’s Special edition for $7.49. Alternatively, you can purchase all four games together for $22.49 and save a few bucks. Ninja Theory’s excellent DmC: Devil May Cry is also on sale for just $9.89.Capcom’s survival horror franchise Dead Rising is available for super cheap. You can grab Dead Rising and Dead Rising 2 for $6 each, Dead Rising 3’s Apocalypse edition for $9, and Dead Rising 4 for only $6. Speaking of zombies, The Walking Dead: The Telltale Definitive Series is 50% off at $22.49. The massive bundle includes all four mainline seasons, 400 Days, and Michonne.Continue Reading at GameSpot
Source: Xbox One's Best Deals This Week: Horror Games, Expansions, And More

Pokemon Go Creator Niantic and Immersive Theater Company Punchdrunk Form Partnership

Pokemon Go Creator Niantic and Immersive Theater Company Punchdrunk Form Partnership

Pokemon Go creator Niantic and immersive theater company Punchdrunk have announced “a multifaceted partnership” that may be using mobile augmented reality capabilities to place immersive theater performances in the real world. An announcement press release doesn’t mention specifics about what that partnership is working on, but it makes clear that the result will combine augmented reality and theatrical performance “on a scale not seen before”. The release continues: “This revolutionary collaboration will lead to new advances in tech-empowered audience experience that will redefine gaming, inspiring audiences for generations to come.” [ignvideo url=”https://www.ign.com/videos/2019/12/26/pokemon-go-buddy-adventure-feature-trailer”] In a statement, Punchdrunk artistic director Felix Barrett specicially mentions mobile gaming, and mentions taking the sense of adventure from his company’s work “into the real world”, implying that this will take the form of an AR app of some kind: “At Punchdrunk we create richly cinematic 3D worlds where audiences can explore, touch and smell the environment; where the boundaries between reality and fantasy are indistinguishable. Those that have seen [Punchdrunk show] Sleep No More often liken the experience to how it might feel to walk into a video game. What happens if you take that sense of adventure into the real world? Tear down the walls and the world becomes your stage. “I believe that Punchdrunk and Niantic can create something that has never been done before. They do it in AR, we do it in real life. Collide the two and I think we will blow people’s minds; bend the rules of genre and redefine the norms of mobile gaming.” [ignvideo url=”https://www.ign.com/videos/pokemon-go-remote-raid-passes-trailer”] Punchdrunk is an influential theater company that has eschewed traditional stages and audiences, instead creating explorable spaces filled with actors, where the audience become part of the story, discovering it at their own pace. Perhaps the company’s most famous work is Sleep No More, an adaptation of Shakespeare’s Macbeth set in a film noir world. Niantic CEO John Hanke says the teams have been working together for “many months” on projects that meld the virtual and real worlds. He says he believes the potential for their work to be “global and massive”. We’ll update you as we learn more. [poilib element=”accentDivider”] Joe Skrebels is IGN’s Executive Editor of News. Follow him on Twitter. Have a tip for us? Want to discuss a possible story? Please send an email to [email protected]
Source: Pokemon Go Creator Niantic and Immersive Theater Company Punchdrunk Form Partnership

Fuser Is the ‘Next Big Step Forward in Music Games’

Fuser Is the ‘Next Big Step Forward in Music Games’

For a lot of folks, independent developer Harmonix isn’t just a music game studio; it’s the music game studio. With the utmost respect to Sony’s highly-successful weaponisation of karaoke with the SingStar series – or indeed the admirable legacy of one much-loved, two-dimensional rapping dog – Harmonix’s work laying the foundation for Guitar Hero and the subsequent creation of Rock Band really make it the big wheel down at the cracker factory. Guitar Hero and Rock Band – each billion-dollar brands that left a permanent stamp on the decade between 2000 and 2009 with high sales and even higher revenue thanks to the added expense of their bespoke instrument controllers – really defined music games for an entire generation of players. Now the Boston-based studio is looking to do it again. [ignvideo width=610 height=374 url=https://www.ign.com/videos/2020/02/26/fuser-announcement-trailer-from-the-makers-of-rock-band] “I’m super excited about Fuser,” says Harmonix veteran Daniel Sussman. “It really does feel like the next big step forward in music games.” “And if you’re a fan of the company you will be able to trace what you see back through all of our work. There are rhythm action elements; certainly this is a performance simulation on par with Rock Band or the early Guitar Hero games. There’s a lot that you will pull forward from Dance Central and the pop sensibility of those games, and then the music mixing mechanic which was first pioneered in Fantasia: Music Evolved and really developed as part of DropMix.” [poilib element=”quoteBox” parameters=”excerpt=Certainly%20this%20is%20a%20performance%20simulation%20on%20par%20with%20Rock%20Band%20or%20the%20early%20Guitar%20Hero%20games”]An understanding of 2017’s DropMix will take you a long way to understanding what’s going on in Fuser. At their core, both DropMix and Fuser are about blending music together in fun, satisfying, and imaginative ways, and there’s arguably not a world of difference between placing physical NFC-enabled cards down on a physical mixing peripheral to dropping in-game samples onto a series of on-screen platters. The two games even use similar design language and colours to illustrate the individual parts of tracks available to use. But there’s a new level of complexity to Fuser that seems to make it a lot more than just DropMix 2.0. Personally, the enjoyment I gleaned from DropMix was more about tossing down cards with little regard for timing and letting the software make it sound as good as possible. The results weren’t always especially elegant but you may be surprised at how many scenarios the iconic ‘ooh wah ah ah…
Source: Fuser Is the ‘Next Big Step Forward in Music Games’

Fuser Is A Music Mashup Game That Makes You Feel Like A Creative Prodigy

Fuser Is A Music Mashup Game That Makes You Feel Like A Creative Prodigy

It’s been about a decade since rhythm games had any major spotlight, but they never really went away. Beat Saber was probably the closest we go to having another resurgence–the VR space now has a bunch of great rhythm-focussed titles if you’re willing to splurge on the expensive hardware (a familiar feeling for genre fans, no doubt). Elsewhere, Japan and Korea still exist, and as a result, so do insane beat-matching games for the inhuman among us.I’ve noticed a little trend of rhythm games coming out this year that lean on the idea of being a DJ. DJMAX Respect V from Korea got a PC release, which subscribes heavily to the school of Konami’s Beatmania series in which DJs are just folks who are really good at smashing out house tunes on a piano. We also have the wonderful Spin Rhythm from Australia, a game that focuses on recreating the analog joys of spinning and scratching a turntable.But if you think about the idea of a contemporary performing DJ, you think of a person on stage, sitting behind some turntables playing records, and if they’re really good, queuing up a great mix of songs, matching beats to create delightful transitions, and maybe even mashing tunes up in surprising ways to get the crowd invested and moving.Continue Reading at GameSpot
Source: Fuser Is A Music Mashup Game That Makes You Feel Like A Creative Prodigy

Fuser – Official Gameplay Reveal Trailer

Fuser – Official Gameplay Reveal Trailer

Check out the first gameplay trailer for Fuser, Harmonix’s new music game where you’ll mix tracks and compete to become the ultimate headliner. Fuser arrives in Fall 2020 on Nintendo Switch, PC, Xbox One, and PS4.
Source: Fuser – Official Gameplay Reveal Trailer