The Legend of Tarzan Review

The Legend of Tarzan Review

Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Lord of the Apes swings back onto the big screen in The Legend of Tarzan, an out-of-touch adventure epic that’s also a misguided foray into historical fiction. It’s not as ridiculous a misfire as its trailers suggested, but The Legend of Tarzan’s biggest saving grace of not being as bad you expected isn’t saying much for a film directed by acclaimed Harry Potter filmmaker David Yates. The film’s plot is basically just a few set-pieces with origin/backstory flashbacks interspersed detailing how the orphaned baby aristocrat John Clayton (played as an adult by Alexander Skarsgard) was found and raised by African apes after his shipwrecked parents died. The movie starts in 1890, years after John has been found and reassimilated into English aristocracy as the Earl of Greystoke. John and his wife Jane (Margot Robbie) now live in England and have not been back to Africa in almost a decade. Their adventures together there years ago are now the stuff of dime novels. Yes, “Tarzan” is a celebrity, a blue-blooded novelty and the stuff of, well, legend. But political machinations in the Congo draw John back there … and into becoming Tarzan once again. Continue reading…
Source: The Legend of Tarzan Review

Submersible drone, powered by Pi

Submersible drone, powered by Pi

A keen scuba diver and RC model maker, Niels Affourtit had always been fascinated by the possibility of building a remote-control submarine, but was deterred due to the expense and the potential for leakages. When he saw footage of a VideoRay underwater ROV (remotely operated vehicle) in 2014, however, his enthusiasm was rekindled and he set out to see if it was feasible to build a video ROV of his own. “When I started Googling, it was the first time I read about the Raspberry Pi,” Niels tells us.“When I found out that the Pi can control servos and ESCs (electronic speed controllers) directly via PWM, has the option for a camera, and has a low power consumption, I realised it was a perfect platform for my ROV.” Naturally, a waterproof hull would also be required. Niels constructed his in just 15 hours using PVCu, similar to drainpipe material. Indeed, the closure is a standard connection for pressure piping, while Niels cut out its transparent screen with a router. The use of brushless motors also helped greatly: “Since the motors are running in water, there are no moving parts through the hull and leakage is almost impossible.” The only parts that pass through the hull are wires for the motors, lights, echosounder, depth and temperature sensors, and communication with a laptop. Since high-frequency wireless signals can’t penetrate water, while low-frequency ones are too slow to send live video, the ROV is tethered to its laptop controller via a long cable. “From OpenROV, I learned to modify a specific Ethernet-over-power adaptor, which reduces the standard four-wire patch cable to only two and makes the wire very insensitive to interference and bad connections. The cable is now 100 metres long, but the maximum reach of the adaptors is in the order of 300m.” Live video and sensor data are viewed on a tethered laptop 3D-printed parts For the propellers and Pi camera tilt system, Niels drafted designs in AutoCAD and 3D-printed them with an Inno3D printer borrowed from a neighbour. “I have experience in 3D drawing via my work [as an engineer for offshore pipelines], so that is an advantage.” Niels’s background in mechanical engineering also came in useful for assembling the electrical components, as did his experience with Python and Linux machines for programming the sensors. Even so, he found the process a real challenge, taking around 200 hours in total.…
Source: Submersible drone, powered by Pi

Viacom's Management Shakeup: What's Next?

Viacom's Management Shakeup: What's Next?

Turning around ratings and ad momentum at key networks and boosting Paramount’s financials are among the items on the to-do list, along with decisions on whether to sell a stake in the studio and recombine with CBS, as some suggest.read more
Source: Viacom's Management Shakeup: What's Next?

Viacom's Management Shake-Up: What's Next?

Viacom's Management Shake-Up: What's Next?

Turning around ratings and ad momentum at key networks and boosting Paramount’s financials are among the items on the to-do list, along with decisions on whether to sell a stake in the studio and recombine with CBS, as some suggest.read more
Source: Viacom's Management Shake-Up: What's Next?