WP Briefing: How WordPress Improves

WP Briefing: How WordPress Improves

In this episode, Josepha Haden Chomphosy explores the WordPress release process. Tune in and learn the phases of a release and catch this week’s small list of big things. Have a question you’d like answered? You can submit them to [email protected], either written or as a voice recording. Credits Editor: Dustin HartzlerLogo: Beatriz FialhoProduction: Chloé BringmannSong: Fearless First by Kevin MacLeod References WordPress 5.7 “Esperanza” Esperanza SpaldingGutenberg Tutorial: Reusable Blocksmake.wordpres.org/testGitHub repository  Transcript Hello, everyone, and welcome to the WordPress briefing, the podcast where you can catch quick explanations of some of the ideas behind the WordPress open source project and the community around it, as well as get a small list of big things coming up in the next two weeks. I’m your host, Josepha Haden Chomphosy. Here we go! All right, so last week, we wrapped up and shipped the WordPress 5.7 release. The release team this time around was smaller than we’ve had in the last couple of years. By the numbers, it looks really good: 66 enhancements or feature requests went in, 127 bugs were fixed, and seven versions of a Gutenberg plugin were merged and backported. If you use WordPress, you are probably aware that we have new releases throughout the year, but you probably don’t know much about the release process. There’s not really a reason to know unless you’re actively contributing to a release. For those interested in knowing more about how we improve WordPress, this week’s exploration is for you. We’re gonna take a look at what goes into WordPress releases and just kind of zoom our way in from the highest level. At the highest level, there are three major WordPress releases a year, plus the minor releases, plus Gutenberg releases. So if you’re following current WordPress work and future WordPress work, that’s going to get you to probably around 30 releases a year. If we zoom in one level to the release itself, a single release of WordPress takes four to five months from start to the day that we ship, and an additional four to six weeks on support and translations, and minor releases after that. If you’re looking from my vantage point, you’ll see that WordPress releases have essentially five parts, some of which happen kind of simultaneously.  The first part is planning and includes the project lead, lead developers, design; groups like that. The second phase is the creation…
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