Classic NES: Build your own Raspberry Pi version

Classic NES: Build your own Raspberry Pi version

Nintendo has released the NES Classic. The reboot of its classic console packs 30 games into a smaller version of the original case. The new NES isn’t the traditional console by any stretch. You don’t get a 6502 processor inside, and it doesn’t use cartridges. A teardown by Polygon reveals an ARM-powered system with 256MH DDR3 RAM and a 512MB SLC NAND Flash. It turns out the new NES  isn’t even as powerful as a Raspberry Pi Zero. It’s also rumoured that the NES Classic is running a custom build of Linux. We think makers would be better to just make their own NES from a Raspberry Pi and RetroPIE. The thought certainly occurred to Snazzy Labs. They just uploaded this video demonstrating how to assemble a Raspberry Pi Zero inside an NES cartridge. You can install RetroPie on your DIY NES and play all the games you want.

DIY NES Classic Mini Killer It’s an excellent guide to building a real  NES emulated system in an original Nintendo game cartridge. It combines a Raspberry Pi Zero with a central USB hub and USB Gamepad. DIY NES Classic parts list and build instructions Raspberry Pi Zero iBuffalo USB Gamepad Amazon Basics USB Hub Mini HDMI to HDMI USB OTG Cable Micro USB Extension NES Security Screwdriver “Nintendo is releasing their NES Classic Edition console this week,” says Snazzy Labs. “It’s exciting to see the Japanese gaming giant excited about their old games again, but the $6o mini console only offers 30 games and is in short supply due to limited quantities and high demand. We suggest an alternative – one that is half the price and half the size – but can hold thousands of games from over three decades of consoles. They don’t use an original NES controller with this build. But there are plenty of NES-style USB Controllers around, like this NES Controller from Amazon. We love the look of the NES Classic but building your own will deliver a much more versatile system. The post Classic NES: Build your own Raspberry Pi version appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
Source: Classic NES: Build your own Raspberry Pi version

Wizard Chess

Wizard Chess

Bethanie Fentiman can’t play chess, but when her imagination sparked and the opportunity presented itself, she brought the iconic game of Wizard’s Chess from Harry Potter to life using a Raspberry Pi, stepper motors, and possibly a little magic. The full article can be found in The MagPi 51 and was written by Alex Bate. For her A-level computing coursework, Bethanie took an idea that had been nestling in the back of her mind, and turned it into a reality. Well, as much of a reality one can create when the literary version includes battling chess pieces that leave their opponents crushed to rubble on the board. Luckily for Bethanie, she’s a self-proclaimed Jambassador, actively participating in the Raspberry Pi scene via the Kent Raspberry Jam. With a community of makers to support her, Bethanie knew that she could complete the build and got to work, researching similar projects online that used magnets and motors to ‘magically’ move chess pieces on a board. Building the board was a brand new experience for Bethanie After an internet search for inspiration, she came across an Instructables build for an Arduino-powered chess-playing robot by user maxjus, and used the main concept as the basis for her build. The guide provided all the information Bethanie needed to build the physical structure of the board, allowing for drawer runners, gears and, of course, the electromagnet that would move each piece when required. A 4tronix PiStep board, along with two 28BYJ-48 stepper motors, took up the job of moving the runners and electromagnet into place, linked through to the Raspberry Pi. As mentioned previously, Bethanie didn’t actually know how to play chess. So when it came to inputting the legal movements of each piece, she had two options: learn fast, or cheat a bit. Opting for the latter due to the time constraints of her coursework deadlines, Bethanie researched all the possible moves of each chess piece and worked them into the code. She could always learn to play the game later on. With so many new skills required, Bethanie thanks Ed Bye for helping her with the electrics of the build A second issue, and one far more associated with the original material from which she was taking her inspiration, was what the pieces would do as they ‘took’ an opponent. In the book, each piece defeats its foes through ‘barbaric’ means. In reality, Bethanie…
Source: Wizard Chess

SLES: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

SLES: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

A version of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) has been created for Raspberry Pi. SUSE is used by the European Space Agency to handle Mission Control and the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (to control SuperMUC, the fastest supercomputer in Europe). In short, it’s an incredibly serious piece of software. So it’s pretty incredible to see it running on a Raspberry Pi. In October, SUSE announced that it had optimised SLES for ARM-based 64-bit servers. Shortly afterwards we saw the first version of SLES on a Raspberry Pi. Unless we’re mistaken, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server is the first fully 64-bit operating system for the Raspberry Pi. Although because the board does not have access to more than 4-GB of RAM, it’s not clear if there’s a real advantage to it being 64-bit. It’s still pretty It’s still a pretty incredible piece of software. And it’s good to be able to train and practice with it on a Raspberry Pi. Using the same software that mission-critical environments rely on every day. Build information: Running SLES: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server on a Raspberry Pi SUSE are so excited they created a music video.

SLES: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for ARM “SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for ARM will give customers more choice, flexibility and opportunities,” said Ralf Flaxa, President of Engineering. “And they will be able to do it faster than ever before.” “We decided to bring SUSE to the Raspberry Pi to increase the visibility for SUSE and SLES,” said Jay Kruemcke, Senior Product Manager. “But to be honest, we really did it because it looked like fun”. “Yes, we actually took the enterprise grade, 64-bit, Linux operating system that is used around the world to support mission-critical workloads in financial institutions, air traffic control centres, manufacturing centres, and high-performance computing centres – and put it on a $35 credit card-sized computer,” writes Jay. “The real breakthrough for us in this process was the enthusiastic support that we received from Eben Upton when we told him of our plans,” Jay told us. The post SLES: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
Source: SLES: SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

Raspberry Pi in medicine

Raspberry Pi in medicine

HeartFelt Technology helps heart failure patients “Heart failure costs the NHS about two billion pounds per year,” reads the Heartfelt Technologies website. Heartfelt is a startup company with a new piece of medical equipment that hopes to reduce this cost drastically, and it’s all powered by a Raspberry Pi. Apparently, one in five people will suffer from heart failure and it’s the most common cause of hospitalisation for people aged over 65. What costs the NHS so much money is that half of these people will regularly require emergency visits; however, many of these (about 75%) could be avoided altogether if patients would report the symptoms leading to a visit. The full article can be found in The MagPi 50 and was written by Rob Zwetsloot. The Heartfelt device watches patients’ feet as they get out of bed in the morning, to detect if there’s any change in swelling or abnormal cardiovascular activity. It’s that simple, and the device could save the NHS a whole lot of money. Powering the device are seven Raspberry Pis and seven cameras, attached to heavily modified face recognition software that now looks for feet. Any changes that meet a certain set of parameters notifies the relevant medical professionals to allow for treatment with a cheap pill that can sort out any issues before a hospital visit is needed. It’s been through medical trials already and has a CE mark, with first orders having been made in August of this year. Patients who have been tested with it don’t mind people seeing their feet, it seems, but they would prefer a nice wood finish on the box to match their decor. Nugenius – Raspberry Pi-powered DNA imaging The Heartfelt monitor isn’t the only medical device powered by Pi: there’s also the Syngene NuGenius, which promises to be an affordable DNA image analyser that could help detect genes that cause certain diseases. Here’s some of the important info: “Complete with a high-resolution 5MP camera, UV filter, and integrated Raspberry Pi computer, the compact NuGenius is the perfect choice for quick, accurate DNA imaging. Featuring a touchscreen controlled by image capture software, the system is simple for both students and experienced scientists alike; they can set up and rapidly generate images of fluorescently labelled gel types commonly used to detect genetic defects, and genes that cause diseases such as cancer.” One step closer to Star Trek The benefit…
Source: Raspberry Pi in medicine

Sega Radica Genesis Raspberry Pi games console

Sega Radica Genesis Raspberry Pi games console

The Sega Genesis (called the “Mega Drive” in the UK and Japan) is one of our all-time favourite consoles. It’s the console that Sonic first appeared on for starters. Over the last few years, we’ve seen traditional consoles re-released as mini home games systems. These all-in-one builds plug directly into your television and enable wisened gamers to relive gaming glories of their youth. Radica is one such console. It’s an all-in-one Sega Genesis/Mega Drive solution with a built-in controller. It looks like a miniaturised version of the classic system. See also: DevSter’s Sega Radica Know-It-All Page There are loads of these consoles around, and you can pick them up on eBay or in hardware exchange shops for minute amounts of money. Even Nintendo is jumping on the bandwagon with the Nintendo Mini NES Classic Edition. But no retro re-released console is as good as a Raspberry Pi running RetroPie. With the open source operating system you can emulate all the different systems, and upload just about any game as a ROM file. Sega Genesis Radica Raspberry Pi video tutorial We love this Radica Raspberry Pi video by Michael Lyons from Florida. Michael starts out with a second-hand Radica Sega Genesis system, takes it apart and wires up the Raspberry Pi 3 all in one session.

” I purchased this off eBay for a dollar,” says Micheal, “plus shipping it was like five bucks.” “So the idea is to use the original controller and fit the Raspberry Pi in this little console here.” Michael takes the console apart and squeezes a Raspberry Pi 3 inside. He uses a multimeter to test the connections. He wires the joystick from the original controller direct to the Raspberry Pi board. The video lasts 20 minutes, and at the end, he has a working retro games console that looks just like a mini Sega Genesis. Watch this video to pick up some skills for your next retro games build. The post Sega Radica Genesis Raspberry Pi games console appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
Source: Sega Radica Genesis Raspberry Pi games console

Burn SD cards with Etcher

Burn SD cards with Etcher

Copying operating system (typically Raspbian) image files to a micro SD card is an essential part of getting started with a Raspberry Pi. It can be a long-winded process, and is often difficult for newcomers to grasp. Mac and Linux users typically use the dd command in the terminal, while Windows users require a program such as Win32DiskImager. So we were pleased to come across Etcher. Etcher turns the whole process of flashing an OS image file into three simple steps: Select Image, Select Drive, and Flash Image. More importantly, the same program, with the same interface, is available on all three types of computer – Windows, Mac, and Linux – which makes it easy for everybody to understand. Etcher takes a lot of the stress out of flashing a drive. Etcher won’t write to your hard drive volumes unless you check Unsafe Mode in Settings. Unsafe Mode is handy if you want to flash a USB thumb drive or other internal drive, but it’s disabled by default, making the process safer for newcomers. We like Etcher so much, we thought we’d create this guide to installing and using it. Follow these steps for hassle-free SD card flashing. STEP-01 Install in Windows or Mac Download and install Etcher from the website. Double-click the .exe file in Windows and follow the Etcher setup wizard. Drag the Etcher app to your Applications folder on a Mac and double-click to open it. In Windows, run Etcher in Administrator Mode: right-click on Etcher and choose ‘Run as administrator’. STEP-02Install on Linux Download the AppImage file from the Etcher website. Open a terminal window and enter:cd Downloads chmod a+x Etcher-linux-x64.AppImage ./Etcher-linux-x64.AppImageSTEP-03 Download your OS image Download a copy of the latest Raspbian image from the Downloads page (or the OS image you want to install). Unzip the file after it has downloaded. Double-click the file in Mac or Linux (or use unzip in a terminal window). In Windows, right-click the file and choose Extract All. Etcher can install directly from a ZIP file, but the process takes a lot longer. STEP-04 Select the image Click Select Image in Etcher. Use the file manager window and locate the image you unzipped in the previous step. Click Open. The image will appear under Select Image, and Connect a drive will highlight red. STEP-05 Insert your SD card Attach your SD card to the computer. Etcher will select…
Source: Burn SD cards with Etcher

Prime Numbers Box project: learn cryptography

Prime Numbers Box project: learn cryptography

Like all good geeks we love our prime numbers. They’re one of the most interesting things to study in mathematics. Maybe that’s why we find this Prime Numbers in a Box project so endearing. It’s pretty simple in practice, press a button; get a prime number. “How many times have you needed the next prime number in a sequence and, like some animal, had to go to a printed table to look it up,” says WhiskyTangoHotel. “Well, those days are over.” Build information: Prime Numbers in a Box

The importance of prime numbers These numbers are popular in encryption and cryptography. This is because the numbers, which are only divisible by themselves and one, can be multiplied together. If you multiply two primes together, you get a public key. This number is used to lock data and can be shared freely. But to unlock the data you need to know the two primes used to generate it. While it’s easy for a computer to generate the key from the two primes, it’s very difficult for the computer to get the two numbers from the key. There’s a great video here by Simon Pampena that explains how prime numbers and cyrptography work.
Learn about primes by building a box that generates them While WhiskeyTangoHotels project doesn’t create primes for cryptography. Instead, the build just celebrates the existence of these great numbers. “The project has an entertaining audio effect if you are into numbers,” says the maker. “Press a button and Primes in a Box gives a audible (relay click) signal for each non prime as it waits to display the next found prime.  If you enjoy mathematics you may find this oddly relaxing.” The button used to generate primes “The Python source is pretty straight-forward, explains the maker. “On button press a pointer to a file containing the first few million primes is indexed and displayed on the LCD. A 5VDC relay clicks to represent the non primes in between.  The rig runs via USB power and the last found prime is always saved.  A handy ‘shutdown’ button is incorporated to allow the Raspberry Pi  to be powered down gracefully if it needs to be moved.” You’ll learn a few things about reading and writing to text files in this project. And you’ll learn how to use an LCD display and relay. More importantly, you’ll never be short of primes again. And you might even…
Source: Prime Numbers Box project: learn cryptography

ZeroSeg review

ZeroSeg review

While playing around with some generic spare parts, including a standard seven-segment LED unit, Richard Saville – aka Average Man vs Pi – had the idea of creating a more polished, Pi Zero-sized display. Following a lot of reverse-engineering, trial and error, and prototyping, he came up with the ZeroSeg, which features two four-digit display units. The full article can be found in The MagPi 51 and was written by Phil King. The first thing to note is that it comes in kit form, with numerous components to solder onto the rear and front of the small board, including various resistors and capacitors. Fortunately, there’s an excellent online assembly guide to help you, as the parts need to be added in a specific order. Quite a bit of precision is required, too. For instance, the MAX7219CNG chip socket must be flush with the board edge to enable you to cram in the two LED units; when soldering the latter, you also need to take care not to touch previously added components on the rear. Still, it’s fun to put together and you get a sense of achievement when it’s completed. To get it working, you need to install the ZeroSeg Python library and spidev, and enable the SPI interface on the Raspberry Pi. In addition to power and ground, it only uses five GPIO pins: 8, 10, 11, 17, and 26; this means there are still plenty to play with if you’re breaking them out or stacking the ZeroSeg on top of another board. The ZeroSeg code library includes a few Python examples to get you started, including a demo that shows off its capabilities, such as the ability to fade the brightness through 15 levels and scroll digits across the display. It’s fairly easy to program by adapting examples, although we couldn’t figure out a way of showing text; this may well have been added by the time you read this, although some letters (such as M and W) are impossible to reproduce on a seven-segment display. So it’s best suited to displaying digits; use cases include a temperature monitor and time/date display. The two programmable mini-buttons are a nice bonus and can be used to switch what’s shown. Last word 4/5 While not as flexible as a matrix display, the ZeroSeg is great for value for money and fun to assemble. More suited to displaying digits than text,…
Source: ZeroSeg review

Eben Upton thanks community at ARM TechCon

Eben Upton thanks community at ARM TechCon

Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading and co-founder of Raspberry Pi gave a speech at ARM TechCon 2016. In his speech, Eben talked about the origin of the Raspberry Pi and how helpful the community was in making the Raspberry Pi a rip-roaring success. “Raspberry Pi would be nothing if not for its community,” said Eben. “Raspberry Pi exists to try to recreate a little bit of that excitement around computing that some of us had when we were children.”

Eben thanks ARM and the Raspberry Pi community Eben also thanked ARM for its support. “Code Club is one of our most impactful activities,” he said. “It would not have got out the door and got to the scale that it was at the point where we merged with them without the extremely generous, and repeated, support of ARM.” “We’ve put a thousand teachers through our teacher training program. We’ve got over 7,000 code clubs in 80 countries,” explained Eben. “Code Club is targetted at nine to eleven-year-olds,” he told the crowd. “Forty percent of people who go to code club are girls. The thirteen-year-olds who got involved with Raspberry Pi back in 2012 are about to start applying to college. In another three or four years, they’re going to enter the workforce.” “If you’re already doing your part for this then thank you very much. And there really is no better time to get involved than now.” The post Eben Upton thanks community at ARM TechCon appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
Source: Eben Upton thanks community at ARM TechCon

German MagPi: new edition available now

German MagPi: new edition available now

Guten tag! The latest edition of The MagPi translated into German is now available to buy. This magazine is the second edition of The MagPi translated for Deutschland by our friends at CHIP. They’ve done a fantastic job, and it’s great to see The MagPi spreading its wings across Europe. Click here to buy the latest edition of The MagPi translated into German Inside the German edition of The MagPi This lead feature in this edition is a translation of MagPi 49. With its headline: “Raspberry Pi Der Super-Guide” it serves as an excellent introduction to Raspberry Pi computing for German students. The Beginner’s Guide to the Raspberry Pi translated into German Inside the magazine, you’ll find a feature on the Apollo Pi and the new PIXEL desktop. We think it looks fantastic. Inside this issue: Raspberry Pi – der Super-Guide für Ein- und Umsteiger. (Beginner’s Guide to Raspberry Pi) Neues Zubehör: ZeroBorg, Piper, Enviro Phat u.v.m. (Reviews of ZeroBorg, Piper and Enviro HAT). RasPi 3 ohne SD-Karte: Booten von USB oder übers Netzwerk. (Boot a Raspberry Pi from USB and over a network) “Germany is our third largest market so it seems natural that, after only 18 months, Germany should be the first country to get a localised version of The MagPi,” said Raspberry Pi Trading CEO Eben Upton. “On a personal note, it’s particularly satisfying for me to see the MagPi launch in Germany, because as a child I used to import German Commodore Amiga magazines, which had so much more technical detail than their UK equivalents,” explained Eben. “The style of the MagPi is very reminiscent of these magazines: I hope that we’re in some sense “returning the favour,” and that German children of all ages (from 8-80) will be inspired to create exciting projects with Raspberry Pi and share them with the world.” Inside the German edition of The MagPi “Like the UK magazine, das offizielle Raspberry Pi Magazin features 100 pages of glossy Raspberry Pi goodness,” said Russell Barnes, The MagPi’s editor. “But unlike its UK language counterpart it’s currently scheduled to run bi-monthly.” The magazine is available now for €9.95 in print or €6.50 on digital devices. You can pick up a subscription for €54.80. Subscribers will also receive the same amazing free gift – a Raspberry Pi Zero and full cable bundle (including the camera ribbon cable). The free PDF edition will follow in 90 days. The post German MagPi: new edition available now appeared…
Source: German MagPi: new edition available now