Learn C with these Raspberry Pi resources

Learn C with these Raspberry Pi resources

This article first appeared in The MagPi 74 and was written by Lucy Hattersley Learn to Code with C £3.99/$5 or free PDF download If you want to learn to program C using a Raspberry Pi, then the best place to start is with our official guide. Written by Raspberry Pi’s very own Simon Long, the UX Engineer responsible for creating the Desktop on both Raspbian and Debian, this book is the perfect guide to C on the Raspberry Pi. Simon has been programming with C since the early nineties and has created everything from mobile phones to medical equipment. The result is a compact and practical programmer’s guide, written from direct experience. Starting with Hello World, the book covers everything from basic variables, strings, and arithmetic, through pointers (a subject many find difficult), and right up to file input and output. What’s great about the Essentials Guide is that it’s a pocket-sized guide to the C language, packing in all the basics in 92 pages. Unlike many books on C, which run to thousands of pages, you get all the essential information and very little waffle. Many members of The MagPi team find this book an invaluable reference guide, and keep a copy on hand whenever programming in C. Online C courses C Programming for Beginners Udemy’s course, by Huw Collingbourne, is extremely beginner-friendly and provides easy-to-follow video tutorials. There’s a huge range of content. The RRP is £29.99, but you will periodically find it on sale (at press time it was £10.99). Look out for special offers on Udemy’s beginner-friendly course Programming Paradigms (Stanford) This classic series of lectures by Stanford Professor Jerry Cain can be found on YouTube. The course teaches students how to write several programming languages, including C, and how to understand the programming paradigms behind each language. Introduction to Programming in C This four-week course by Duke University is designed to teach problem-solving with the C programming language. It’s not cheap (a subscription to Coursera is £37 per month), but Coursera certificates are recognised by many companies, so it’s a good option for those looking for a professional qualification. CS50’s Introduction to Computer Science Free Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are online training schemes available for anyone to enrol in. We’re big fans of MITx, but Harvard has hands-down the best introduction to Computer Science with the C programming language. Introduction to Computer Science CS50…
Source: Learn C with these Raspberry Pi resources

Free Raspberry Pi 3A+ with a 12-month subscription

Free Raspberry Pi 3A+ with a 12-month subscription

Take out a 12-month subscription to The MagPi magazine and we’ll give you a free Raspberry Pi 3A+ board worth £25. The Raspberry Pi 3A+ is the latest Raspberry Pi computer. It has the a 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core processor, dual-band wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2/BLE in the same mechanical format as the Raspberry Pi 1 Model A+ Click here to take out a 12-month subscription to The MagPi magazine. Get a free Raspberry Pi 3A+ worth £25 with a 12-month subscription to The MagPi How to get your free Raspberry Pi 3A+ We’ve only got a limited amount of Raspberry Pi 3A+ boards, so if you want to get a free Raspberry Pi 3A+ be sure to snap up a subscription soon. Click here to visit The Raspberry Pi Press Store Choose your Location Click Add to Cart The free Raspberry Pi 3A+ will be added to your cart alongside the 12-month subscription. Click Check Out and enter your email, and shipping address. Complete the purchase and we will ship you a Raspberry Pi 3A+ and an issue of The MagPi. You’ll get 12 copies of The MagPi magazine in total. One every month as it is released. The offer replaces our usual free Pi Zero W and Official Case. Once we have run out of Raspberry Pi 3A+ we will revert to our usual (and still amazing) offer of a free Pi Zero W. More importantly. You’ll get the next 12 issues of The MagPi magazine delivered directly to your door. The MagPi  magazine has inspirational projects from the maker community, and incredible tutorials that teach you coding, electronics and maker skills. The Raspberry Pi 3A+ board What is a Raspberry Pi 3A+? The Raspberry Pi 3A+ is the latest single board computer (SBC) from Raspberry Pi. It’s a low-cost computer used by digital makers, computer enthusiasts and students of all ages. With a Raspberry Pi 3A+ you can run Raspbian (the official OS) based on Debian Linux. Or you can run a range of different operating systems. The Raspberry Pi can be programmed, and the GPIO (General Purpose Input/Output) pins enable it to control, and respond to, electronic components. You can turn the Raspberry Pi into almost anything. A media player, music system, retro gaming console, a magic mirror, smart speaker, just use it as an extremely versatile home computer. It’s easy to use, and The MagPi features regular…
Source: Free Raspberry Pi 3A+ with a 12-month subscription

Black Friday: 50% off Raspberry Pi Press, free delivery, special offers!

Black Friday: 50% off Raspberry Pi Press, free delivery, special offers!

Raspberry Pi fans should take a look at the Raspberry Pi Press store for some great deals on books, back issues of The MagPi, and Essentials Guides. We think our books and magazines are always great value, but today you can get an even better deal on lots of Raspberry Pi Press items. You can currently get up to 50% off copies of The MagPi magazine and HackSpace magazine, plus a great range of other deals and offers. Order two of the 2019 project books in any combination and receive 50% off the second book of your choice. Mix it up with one of each, or buy two of the same. Why not keep one and gift one? Discounts will be automatically applied during checkout… Half-price The MagPi and HackSpace magazines Here are just some of the things you’ll currently find on the Raspberry Pi Press store: Half-price: The MagPi, Hackspace. Readers can currently pick up all available issues of The MagPi magazine, and back-issues of HackSpace for just £2.99 (half the usual store price). 2019 Project Books: Buy one, get one half-price. Buy The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book Volume 4 and get The Book of Making for half-price. Free Essentials Guide with Beginner’s Book. Buy The Official Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Book (with Pi Zero W included) and get any Essentials Guide of your choosing. This is a great Christmas gift! Add both to your cart and enter the code FREEBOOK during checkout. Buy The Beginner’s Book and get an Essentials Guide free Plus! Raspberry Pi Press is currently offering FREE shipping on all orders over £50. Automatically applied during checkout. There’s never been a better time to pick up a copy of The MagPi magazine, or fill out your collection of back issues. Projects Book V4 and Book of Making: buy one get one half-price Buy Raspberry Pi Projects Book and get Book of Making half price The post Black Friday: 50% off Raspberry Pi Press, free delivery, special offers! appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
Source: Black Friday: 50% off Raspberry Pi Press, free delivery, special offers!

Eben Upton: Making magazines

Eben Upton: Making magazines

Once, I thought running a hardware company would be all about making hardware. Turns out, it’s actually about learning new things. When we started back in 2006, I was an embedded software engineer: I knew how to crank out high-performance C and assembler for mobile phones, games consoles, and microcontrollers, but absolutely nothing about how to design chips or PCBs, still less how to build millions of units of a physical product and get them to customers all over the world. Still, it’s amazing what you can pick up if you hang out with bright people. This article first appeared in The MagPi 75 and was written by Eben Upton Once upon a time Around the time I was building the first Raspberry Pi prototype (on Veroboard!) in 2006, I joined Broadcom as a software engineer in the video and graphics team, and got my first taste of hardware design. Although I was supposed to stick to writing firmware, every software engineer had access to the Verilog source code for the chip that we were working on. Nobody in their right mind would let me write a module from scratch, but if I could find a bug, and get my fix signed off by the real hardware engineer in the next cubicle (future Raspberry Pi COO James Adams), my code might make it into the chip. A couple of years later, we started work on the first real Raspberry Pi design. There’s a vast difference between soldering down some PDIP chips on a piece of Veroboard, with signals running at a few tens of megahertz, and escaping high-speed signals like HDMI from a fine-pitch BGA on a six-layer PCB. But I got to watch over my co-founder Pete Lomas’s shoulder while he laid out what would become the classic Raspberry Pi Model B. And six months later, I got to watch Mike Buffham (future Raspberry Pi Director of Product Management) figure out how to build Pete’s design in volume at Sony. I’ll never be able to write Verilog like James, lay out a PCB like Pete, or juggle a supply chain like Mike. But hanging out with them taught me more about hardware, and about business, than any course or textbook could. Going to print Which brings me to publishing. At the start of 2015, we had the opportunity to take up the reins of The MagPi from Ash, Will, Ian, and…
Source: Eben Upton: Making magazines

How to install NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi

How to install NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi

How do I install NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi is a common question for beginner’s to ask. NOOBS (New Out Of Box Software) is a piece of software designed to make installing an OS (operating system) on a Raspberry Pi as quick and simple as possible. With NOOBS you can install Raspbian (the default OS for Raspberry Pi) along with other operating systems that turn the Raspberry Pi into a retro gaming console, media player, and much more. Click here for a free digital Raspberry Pi QuickStart guide made by The MagPi team. Get a free Raspberry Pi with a subscription to The MagPi. Click here for more information. In this tutorial: How to format an microSD Card Download and copy the NOOBS software to the microSD Card Power up a Raspberry Pi and use NOOBS to install Raspbian OS Setting up Raspbian OS See also: Easy retro gaming on a Raspberry Pi with Lakka and NOOBS Beginner’s Guide to NOOBS Install NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi Now you’ve got all the pieces together, it’s time to install an operating system on your Raspberry Pi, so you can start using it. Raspbian is the official OS for the Raspberry Pi, and the easiest way to set up Raspbian on your Raspberry Pi is to use NOOBS (New Out Of Box Software). If you bought a NOOBS pre-installed 16GB microSD card, you can skip to “Assemble your Raspberry Pi”. Otherwise you’ll need to format a microSD card and copy the NOOBS software to it. Prepare to format Start by downloading SD Card Formatter tool from the SD Card Association website. Now attach the microSD card to your PC or Mac computer and launch SD Card Formatter (click Yes to allow Windows to run it). If the card isn’t automatically recognised, remove and reattach it and click Refresh. The card should be selected automatically (or choose the right one from the list). Format the microSD Choose the Quick Format option and then click Format (if using a Mac, you’ll need to enter your admin password at this point). When the card has completed the formatting process, it’s ready for use in your Raspberry Pi. Leave the microSD card in your computer for now and simply note the location of your duly formatted card. Windows will often assign it a hard drive letter, such as D; on a Mac it will appear in…
Source: How to install NOOBS on a Raspberry Pi

The best Python websites and resources

The best Python websites and resources

Python is one of the most popular coding languages around. Easy to pick up, and you can quickly learn Python. With the right resources and a Raspberry Pi computer, it is easy to learn Python. It doesn’t take a beginner long to pick up the basics. And there are lots of resources out there ready to help you learn. In this feature we’ve gathered together some of our favourite Python coding tutorials, websites and resources. Get a free Pi Zero W, Official Case, and Accessories with your 12-month subscription to The MagPi. Click here for more info. See also Learn Python with a Raspberry Pi Learn Python object-oriented programming with a Raspberry Pi Thonny on a Raspberry Pi: using the new Python IDE in Raspbian Create a Python game: how to make a puzzle game called Same Learn Python with the best video resources The Official Raspberry Pi YouTube channel The Official Raspberry Pi channel is packed with resources for learning to code, and almost all of them feature Python. You’ll also find advice on setting up a Raspberry Pi, plus how to make awesome things with Raspberry Pi, Python, and electronics. Be sure to subscribe!

Geek Gurl Diaries This fantastic website offers a crash course on computer science and programming by none other than Code Club’s Carrie Anne Philbin. It covers a range of boards and technologies, but be sure to take a look at the Raspberry Pi tutorials.
  Learn Python A more advanced collection of video tutorials put together by Free Code Camp. This comprehensive course isn’t Raspberry Pi specific, but covers everything from getting started with strings all the way up to objects and inheritance.
Learn Python with Interactive websites Raspberry Pi Education The Raspberry Pi Education section on the official website should be your first port of call when learning anything with a Raspberry Pi, and Python is no exception. Here you’ll find tutorials, blog posts, and education resources. Sign up to the Education Newsletter while you’re there. Future Learn Raspberry Pi has teamed up with FutureLearn to provide interactive courses, most of which are in Python (and there’s a great Scratch to Python course). The courses are structured to last three to four weeks and only require a few hours a week to learn. Codecademy One of the most popular coding sites around is Codecademy. Here you sign up…
Source: The best Python websites and resources

Raspberry Pi 3A+ development interview

Raspberry Pi 3A+ development interview

The last time the Raspberry Pi family had a new A-form-factor design, more compact and lightweight than the full-size B and B+ ranges, it was the Raspberry Pi A+ released four years ago. Since then, the family has grown considerably: we’ve seen the Pi 2, Pi 3, Pi Zero, Pi Zero W and WH, and most recently the 3B+. Check out our Raspberry Pi 3A+ benchmarks for a technical breakdown of the 3A+ compared to other Pi models Now, the Raspberry Pi 3A+ is here, packing the power of the 3B+ into the same footprint as the original Pi A+. Eben Upton describes it as “the best product we can make.” Read on to hear more of his thoughts. Get a free Pi Zero W, Official Case, and Accessories with your 12-month subscription to The MagPi. Click here for more info. Timetables “We describe our product design process as resembling a bunch of trains driving along, because we’re dealing with a bunch of subsystems,” Eben Upton, co-founder of the Raspberry Pi Foundation, explains of the development process that has delivered the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+. “Some subset of the trains will arrive at the station, and when enough of them arrive then we’ve got a new product we can make. We don’t have a big team of marketing guys who make PowerPoints about our roadmap. It’s much more coffee-table-oriented than that.” Bringing back the A+ “The A+ form factor was always a good form factor,” says Roger Thornton, Principal Hardware Engineer. “A lot of people have asked us for an A+ again, and we were able to make that, so we did.” With both the Raspberry Pi 2 and 3 having launched exclusively in larger B-variant form factors, the A+ has been absent from the line-up for a full two generations. “It was skipped for Raspberry Pi 2 because it simply wasn’t around for long enough,” recalls Eben. “It normally takes six to nine months for us to get our feet under ourselves, and by that time it was very clear that the 3B was imminent.” “The Zero W happened the year after the 3B,” Roger adds, “and to some extent addressed the gap that an A+ might have occupied.” The Zero family isn’t a complete replacement for the A+, though, as the launch of the Pi 3B+ earlier this year hammered home. As with any Raspberry Pi, the…
Source: Raspberry Pi 3A+ development interview

The best Raspberry Pi Starter Kits

The best Raspberry Pi Starter Kits

When you first get a Raspberry Pi, there are always a few things you need to get to go with it. A microSD card, cables, keyboards, electronics components, etc. With these starter kits, you can kick-start your learning with Raspberry Pi. See also: The 10 best Raspberry Pi cases Get a free Pi Zero W and Starter Kit with your 12-month subscription to The MagPi. Click here for more information. Official Raspberry Pi 3 Starter Kit: Simple and clean The smart starter kit (pictured above) from Raspberry Pi (£119 / $140) includes a Raspberry Pi 3, as well as an official power supply, case, mouse, and keyboard. You even get Carrie Anne Philbin’s excellent book, Adventures in Raspberry Pi, to start your Pi journey with. The official Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Book: Kit and book This is not just a book full of excellent tutorials to get your started on your Pi journey– it’s also a Pi Zero kit! The Official Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Book (£25 / $33) comes with a Pi Zero W, adapter cables, a preloaded microSD card, and a case. Raspberry Pi 3B+ essentials kit: Just the essentials This essentials kit (£58 / $63) also comes with a Raspberry Pi, a slimmed-down Pibow case, a power supply, and a microSD card. The very essentials you’ll need to get your Raspberry Pi running – along with a free Pi sticker. Raspberry Pi 3 B+ Starter Kit: A bigger kit This bigger starter kit from Pimoroni (£90 / $98) includes a keyboard, mouse, stickers, a Blinkt! light strip, and a getting started guide! It’s a nice beginner’s kit that comes in a very pretty box, and those stickers are very important. Retro Gaming Kit: Classic gaming fun A lot of people love to use their Raspberry Pi to play retro games on, and this Retro Gaming Kit (£76 / $102) is specifically designed to help you quickly make a great-looking Pi-powered console. The NES-style case is a nice touch. Media Center Kit: Improve your TV As popular as retro gaming is on the Pi, home theatre PCs and media centres are even more popular among the community. This Media Centre Kit (£76 / $102) comes with all the essentials to get your HTPC Pi going, along with a lovely remote to control it all with. GoPiGo3: Robot for beginners While not the cheapest robot kit around, we think the GoPiGo3 (£76 / $100) is…
Source: The best Raspberry Pi Starter Kits

Camera Module projects

Camera Module projects

We’ve selected six Camera Module-related projects to try out. If you need some inspiration, then take a look at the pick of the bunch. Here is our guide to the best Camera Module projects for Raspberry Pi. Get a free Pi Zero W, Official Case, and Accessories with your 12-month subscription to The MagPi. Click here for more info. Pi Zero LED case hack As you now know, the NoIR version of the Camera Module has the infrared filter removed from the lens so that it can detect infrared light. This makes it an ideal choice for projects in the dark. In this neat project, you can easily add IR LEDs to provide additional infrared light, so that your pictures capture more detail in the dark – and all housed within the official Raspberry Pi Zero case, too! Move around Mr Orange Stop-motion animation Stop-motion animation – think Wallace & Gromit – is where a series of photographs are taken, but with minor changes made to the ‘scene’ being filmed. The scene is changed slightly between shots – known as frames – and when they are all stitched back together afterwards, the illusion of animation is complete! In this fantastic tutorial, learn how to add a button to your Camera Module setup and create your very own stop-motion animation! Upcycle an old camera Rodak: a Pi in a Kodak Taking photos is what the Camera Module is designed for, so what better way to do that than to upcycle an old Kodak Brownie Flash III camera to house a Raspberry Pi Zero, like Alex Ellis did? It also contains some additional components, such as a LiPo battery for power-on-the-go, a push-button to trigger the camera, and a cool NeoPixel status LED to show you when the camera is ready to fire again! Let Google tell you what it sees Google Vision: Camera Tell This cool project, by Dan Aldred (aka TeCoEd), makes use of the Google Vision cloud service. If you haven’t heard of Google Vision, it uses artificial intelligence to analyse an image and tells you what is in it! Dan takes this project even further by creating a portable camera – housed inside an old disposable camera – that uses a Camera Module, as well as Google Vision to announce what you have just taken a photo of. Keep a close eye on your house Home CCTV with…
Source: Camera Module projects

Community interview – Dave Honess

Community interview – Dave Honess

“My earliest memory of being interested in space was watching Halley’s Comet as a nine-year-old,” Dave Honess tells us. We know Dave personally – he used to work at the Raspberry Pi Foundation as the man behind Astro Pi, and he’s even written a couple of tutorials in the magazine. These days, Dave works with the European Space Agency (ESA) to help organise their educational programs, and liaises with current Astro Pi programs at the Foundation. “Most of my career had nothing to do with space,” Dave admits. “But I always maintained an interest and enjoyed watching the ISS live streams in the early noughties when it was still being built. I never even imagined that the space industry could be a place where I might work one day; it always seemed so distant and abstract.” Dave started working for the Raspberry Pi Foundation in early 2014, and soon found himself talking to folks from the UK Space Agency about a collaboration that eventually became the first Astro Pi mission. Ed, one of the Astro Pi computers on board the ISS “A friend working at ESA in the Netherlands told me he was changing jobs and that his position was going to become vacant.” Dave said. “We spent about an hour on the phone discussing all aspects of the work and… I decided to apply for the job. We have now moved to the Netherlands, and I have been working at ESA ESTEC [European Space Research and Technology Centre] since March 2018.” What’s your favourite memory of working in the intersection of space and education? “It’s hard to pick just one. I’m really grateful to my former colleagues at the Raspberry Pi Foundation for allowing me to travel to Florida to watch the OA-4 rocket launch at Kennedy Space Center in 2015 (the one carrying the original Astro Pi hardware to the ISS). I have strong memories of talking to the kids that have participated in Astro Pi, and hearing them say they now want to study aeronautics or astrophysics and suchlike.” Do you have any personal space-related plans? “I do, actually. Every year, ESA organises a staff trip to French Guiana to see the Ariane launch facility; you have to fund the flights yourself, but you’ll get access to the launch site and a guided tour. If you’re lucky, you also get to see an integrated launch vehicle sitting…
Source: Community interview – Dave Honess