Arcade Games in The MagPi #78

Arcade Games in The MagPi #78

Discover a triple-bill of neat arcade game projects in The MagPi #78. Build a Pinball Machine Code a 3D adventure Play PC games Click here to buy The MagPi magazine issue #78 Arcade Games Gaming is a way we learn over on The MagPi, and we’ve got three amazing projects that are fun and functional. One The MagPi reader Martin Kauss has turned an old kid’s bed into a fully-functioning Pinball Machine. We just had to show you how; our Build a Pinball machine is a step-by-step guide to making a ball-flipper of your own. We were delighted this month when Steam brought its amazing Steam Link technology to Raspberry Pi. With Steam Link you can stream PC games on a Raspberry Pi. Discover how to turn your Raspberry Pi into a full PC gaming machine and take your games to the television. Plus! Mark Vanstone has been making some amazing games with Raspberry Pi. This month he brings all his Python gaming tutorial skills together for a grand adventure. Discover how to build a 3D adventure game. Discover a range of Arcade Games projects in The MagPi 78 Discover APIs and Build a Fortnite Tracker APIs (application programming interfaces) sit at the heart of many builds. With a good API you can hook a Raspberry Pi up to an internet service and make all kinds of weird and wonderful things. Like this Fortnite Ticker (which displays your score). Build a Fortnite Sense HAT ticker with Raspberry Pi Community interviews: Lisa Rode Raspberry Pi is as a community, and every issue of The MagPi is packed with community news. This month we interview Lisa Rode, who brings robots to the classroom and creates incredible Computer Science lessons. Lisa Rode interview Make a Sense HAT MP3 player Remember Mp3 players? Building your own is a fantastic project and you can learn how to control media, play audio, and use the Controls on a Sense HAT to skip and select tracks. We even create a disco effect using the LEDs on a Sense HAT board. Make a Sense HAT MP3 Player There’s a lot more to discover in The MagPi #78. Martin Mander has updated his retro television to use the DVB TV Hat; PJ Evans shows us how to make a working telephone exchange and Rob Zwetsloot shares the top 10 wearable projects. Plus! Win one of two PiDP-11 Retro Computers.…
Source: Arcade Games in The MagPi #78

Win 1 of 2 PiDP-11 kits!

Win 1 of 2 PiDP-11 kits!

We reviewed the PiDP-11 recently, loving its straightforward build and beautifully accurate case. Get your hands on one with this competition. We have two kits to give away! Wine one of two PiDP-11 kits! https://js.gleam.io/e.js The post Win 1 of 2 PiDP-11 kits! appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
Source: Win 1 of 2 PiDP-11 kits!

Smart door automation

Smart door automation

Is your door a bore? Open and close, open and close. Snoozefest. Surely it can do more than that? How about a smart door that knows when someone approaches, when the post arrives, and can even offer remote viewing of the peephole? You can also add intelligent lighting, a controllable door lock, and facial recognition, all powered with your Raspberry Pi. So, let’s ignore super-expensive door systems and build our own. You can do as much, or as little, as you like of this project and there’s plenty of room for new and inventive uses. This article first appeared in The MagPi 77 and was written by PJ Evans You’ll need Raspberry Pi Touch Display Camera Module PIR sensor 2 × Security door contact reed switch Wired doorbell PAM8302 amplifier Speaker Magnetic access control system Prepare your Raspberry Pi Although you can use any WiFi-capable Pi, this is a perfect project for the new Raspberry Pi 3A+. Start by attaching the Pi to the Touch Display and preparing a microSD card with the latest Raspbian Stretch release. To allow easier access and mounting, we’ve detached the control board from the back of the screen, taking great care of the ribbon cable. Eventually, they’ll be put in a smart 3D-printed case. Now, get your Pi set up and make sure to sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade before proceeding. Attach the camera We’re going to keep an eye on the outside world by replacing the door’s peephole with the Raspberry Pi camera. A peep-hole is typically a two-piece barrel that screws together and can be easily unscrewed from the inside. Remove the barrel and cover the hole with the camera. We’re just going to affix this with tape for now; a printed mount will come later. Mount the screen and Pi to the door (we used 3M Command strips), placed so you can attach the camera’s ribbon cable to the Pi once it’s shut down. Make sure the camera is enabled in Raspberry Pi Configuration or raspi-config. Footsteps approaching! The first smart thing our door is going to do is detect someone approaching it. A cheap PIR sensor is perfect for the job. These cool little geodesic domes are triggered by heat and are the same gizmos that you find in motion-sensor lights, switches, and security systems. Connect to the Pi as shown below, checking whether you have a 5 V or…
Source: Smart door automation

Compute Module 3+ launched: specs and price

Compute Module 3+ launched: specs and price

Raspberry Pi has launched a new Compute Module 3+ board featuring technical enhancements inspired by recent Raspberry Pi products. Aimed at businesses, and industrial users, the Compute Module is used to embed a Raspberry Pi into systems and commercial products. The Compute Module uses a standard DDR2 SODIMM (small outline dual in-line memory module) form factor. GPIO and other I/O functions are routed through the 200 pins on the board. The new Compute Module 3+ sports the Broadcom BCM2837B0 chip, albeit clocked at 1.2GHz and with 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM. “As always, we try to learn lessons from the market,” says Eben Upton, CEO and Raspberry Pi co-founder. “We haven’t increased the rated clock speed, as this is dependent on having the MaxLinear PMIC, which won’t fit into the Compute Module 3+ form factor,” explains Eben. Rather than speed things up, the aim is to run cooler: “Compute Module 3+ brings improved thermal performance and some tweaks to the PCB (printed circuit board) from Raspberry Pi 3B+.” Compute Module 3+ specifications Processor: Broadcom BCM2837B0, Cortex-A53 64-bit SoC @ 1.2GHz Memory: 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM Flash memory (eMMC): 8GB / 16GB / 32GB Multimedia: H.264, MPEG-4 decode (1080p30), H.264 encode (1080p30), OpenGL ES 1.1, 2.0 graphics Operating temperature:-20 to +70°C Price: $30 (8GB), $35 (16GB), $40 (32GB), $25 (CM3+/Lite) Net weight: 9 g (board only) Dimensions: Board; 67.6 × 31.1 × 3.7 mm Compute Module 3+ eMMC storage options Compute Module 3+ is an “opportunity to deploy designs in environments with a wider range of temperatures,” says Eben, and engineers can “drive the chip harder, for longer, without hitting thermal limits.” The operating temperature range now ranges from -20 to +70 degrees C. The new models also boast expanded on-board storage. Models are available with 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB of on-board eMMC flash memory. A Compute Module 3+ Lite option remains available. Users wire the module pins up to an eMMC or SD card. “Lite accounts for around a quarter of Compute Module sales,” reveals Eben. Compute Module 3+ price Customers have been requesting larger storage options, and the new models are sure to be popular with media and data-logging developers. “With flash prices falling, it felt like a good time to address this,” says Eben. “We’ll have Lite, 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB options at $25, $30, $35, and $40 respectively. At the high end, that’s a lot of fun for $40.” A separate Raspberry Pi…
Source: Compute Module 3+ launched: specs and price

PiDP-11 Review

PiDP-11 Review

The launch of Digital’s PDP-8 minicomputer in the 1960s was a defining moment in computing history, laying down the foundations of the hardware and software architectures we use today. Both it and the later PDP-11 were not only powerful machines, but also beautifully designed objects. Oscar Vermeulen, an admirer of PDP range, has sold over 2,000 of his PiDP-8 replica: a Raspberry Pi-powered emulator with a fully functional one-third scale front-panel. Now comes his PiDP-11 kit. Released in 1970, the original PDP-11 is the most successful ‘mini’ computer in history, with over 600,000 sold. Dimensions: 17×31×6 cm Model: PDP-11/70 from $250 Architecture: 16-bit OS: RSX-11M Plus Blinkenlights: 64 Author’s link: magpi.cc/wgWNTC Remarkable replica For this new kit, a painstaking process has resulted in an injection-moulded replica of the original PDP-11’s case. If not for the one-third scale, you would struggle to tell it apart from the real thing. A perfect facia and custom-built switchgear complete the package. You even get a key and lock, just like the real thing. Once built, the PiDP-11 PCB comprises 64 LEDs, two rotary encoders, and an array of switches that connect to the Pi’s GPIO. Running a special version of the SimH emulator, the Pi accurately handles input and output from the panel. You can hook up a screen if you wish, use SSH, or go old-school and implement RS-232. The back panel is provided with different cut-outs to suit your cabling. A back panel is provided with cut-outs for popular connectors, or you can leave it open. Digital-it-yourself The PiDP-11 is supplied in kit form and there’s a lot to do. You’ll need to have some experience in soldering to put this together, the focus being on accurately fitting the switches and LEDs. This is tricky, but Oscar has provided jigs that make the alignment of all these components much easier than with the PiDP-8. The instructions are in an alpha stage, but they are clear and the switch section is especially detailed. It took us about five hours to complete. “An essential purchase for anyone with an interest in computing history” Full instructions are provided on how to prepare the Pi for its new career in 1970s computing. At the time of publication, a one-stop SD card image should be available. Otherwise, there are a few hoops to jump through, but nothing too arcane and the steps are well explained. Once you log…
Source: PiDP-11 Review

E-ink Display Project

E-ink Display Project

Did you know that e-ink displays can retain what they’re showing, even without electricity? By anyone’s standards, that makes them pretty ecological. The E-ink Display Project, developed by Anke Dietzen, is a resourceful and inventive take on a very cool way of displaying information. The project’s origins came through reading an article about the Raspberry Pi, as Anke explains: “I thought ‘how cool is that?’, and I wanted to do something with the Raspberry Pi. I ordered [one] and, very enthusiastically, a big sensor kit. As I had no knowledge of electrical engineering, I had to learn some basics and I was very happy then to light a diode on a breadboard.” At the same time, Anke bought a small Waveshare e-ink display, which she favoured for its very clear and precise visuals. Armed with her new purchases, she set about coming up with a practical display that would also look good. “I wanted to do something with e-ink displays which I thought should be at least a little useful,” she tells us. “As, in the morning, I normally check the weather via smartphone, I thought it would be nice to read the latest weather information and calendar entries / birthdays with just one look.” The smaller display shows useful information including a weather forecast and events Picture perfect As well as including informative data such as forecasts and reminders, Anke wanted the possibility of having images on the screen, so, “I used a bigger three-colour display (7.5-inch – 640×384 pixels) for showing pictures. The picture shown was always taken in the same month of the actual date, in the style of ‘do you know what happened X years ago at this time?’” she says. In addition, she describes the key benefit of using an e-ink display: “If you disconnect [it] from power, the Raspberry Pi will keep the last picture forever, unlike the ‘normal’ displays which need power to show something. The power consumption is very low in standby mode.” Ink…redible So, how does it work? Anke reveals, “The Raspberry Pi controls two e-ink displays. On the Pi, all the time an application server with a database is running. Over a webpage (REST interface), the actions can be triggered: actions are, for example, ‘store message in database’, ‘fetch weather information from internet and store in database’, ‘store picture info in database’, ‘refresh display from database’, etc. For displaying a picture,…
Source: E-ink Display Project

Raspberry Pi Projects Book Volume 4

Raspberry Pi Projects Book Volume 4

Raspberry Pi projects are loved the world over by educators and makers thanks to how creative and accessible they can be. A great resource for all abilities (including beginners), we’ve packed the fourth edition of the projects book with 200 pages of inspiring projects, practical tutorials, and definitive reviews… Get stuck in with fantastic Raspberry Pi builds Some of the very best Raspberry Pi Projects Plus much more: + Get involved with the amazing and very active Raspberry Pi community + Be inspired by incredible projects made by other people + Learn how to make with your Raspberry Pi with our tutorials + Find out about the top kits and accessories for your Pi projects Ready to start making? Click below to secure your copy… > PRINT EDITION > DIGITAL EDITION The post Raspberry Pi Projects Book Volume 4 appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
Source: Raspberry Pi Projects Book Volume 4

SelfieBot

SelfieBot

After Sophy Wong’s SelfieBot wakes from a snooze, it makes a cute noise, sings a song, winks at a passer-by, and then blinks silently. Or at least, it does if it’s left alone for long enough: its ability to capture fun photos and print them on to thermal paper ensures it’s nearly always in demand. SelfieBot sprung into life in 2017 when Sophy and her husband Kim Pimmel created an early version for their local Seattle Mini Maker Faire. “We thought that if we created a fun selfie-taking experience, with something visitors could take home like a printed photo, it would encourage people to the booth and give them another way to interact with our projects.” The plan worked a treat. SelfieBot – mains-powered and made from laminated laser-cut plywood – went down a storm, so the couple decided to refine the concept for 2018. Rather than have it tethered to one location, they opted for a mobile version. “I redesigned the circuit so that it could be powered by a small 7.2 V NiMH battery like the ones in radio-controlled cars,” Sophy explains. The idea of putting a Raspberry Pi 2 at its heart remained, however. “We hardly print anything these days, especially photos, so it’s a lot of fun” The Pi is connected to a Pi Cobbler which routes all of the Pi’s GPIO pins to a Perma-Proto board. A Pi Camera Module V2 is used to take photos, while a mini metal speaker is hooked up to an Adafruit mono 2.5 W class D audio amplifier, to allow the SelfieBot’s sounds and jokes to be clearly heard. For its face, which beams bright from a 5-inch HDMI display, the couple conducted a lot of research. “We analysed the features of cute robots and scary robots, knowing that we wanted a face and sounds that were appealing, cute, and non-threatening,” Sophy says. Kim created the code for this, producing animated faces – made up of individual images played in sequence. “When paired with sounds, which are recordings of my voice, the illusion is complete. We used the Pygame engine to drive the graphics and sounds, and CUPS for printing.” When the accelerometer detects it has been placed on its back, the SelfieBot falls asleep and shows a snoring animation. And action Photos are outputted to a portable thermal printer. “It’s very satisfying to watch the image print before your very…
Source: SelfieBot

Inspired by robots: Raspberry Pi Workshops in Puerto Rico

Inspired by robots: Raspberry Pi Workshops in Puerto Rico

My background is really related to rock and soils,” Alex mentions to us. He’s recently tagged The MagPi Twitter account into a post about his workshops in Puerto Rico. “I graduated from the Department of Geology of the University of Puerto Rico. I took a C++ course which I found very interesting and that was it, until the maker movement hit me five years ago.” Alex helped start a makerspace with his friends and family in 2014, and he learnt all about microcontrollers and the Raspberry Pi from the community that gathered there. “Then, back in 2016 I went to US to be part of the first cohort of Raspberry Pi Certified Educators,” Alex reveals. “Since then I have been introducing the Raspberry Pi ecosystem to the classroom and helping fellow educators in the island with talks and workshops along with fellow makers.” Like us, you may be wondering how the US territory of Puerto Rico is doing after Hurricane Maria devastated it last year. Alex himself refers to Puerto Rico today as paradise, but it’s clear there are still some long-lasting effects: “The hurricane hit us very bad. We had to cancel many maker-related events and gatherings. Many of our friends still work on their personal projects on their houses, but we lost most of the momentum by staying closer to family.” Did you know the box also doubled as a robot chassis? What prompted you to start the workshops? The current workshop that we are giving in my school started because my school Director wanted me to enter a robotic league competition, but the fees and equipment were very expensive and we couldn’t afford it. Most of the educators I talked to are experienced in VEX [robotics] competitions and had been in the US finals, but never had an experience on any Raspberry Pi-related projects. This was another reason to start these workshops: many of them wanted to build projects from scratch and teach their kids computer programming skills. The Raspberry Pi community is very resourceful and here we found the Pi Wars events. So I sent a message to Pi Wars organisers in order to ask for permission to make a Pi Wars-like event with fellow educators here in Puerto Rico. I asked my colleague Damaso Cardenales – who is a member of our Makerspace PR, Inc., and a computer programmer – to help me with this…
Source: Inspired by robots: Raspberry Pi Workshops in Puerto Rico

Retro gaming galore: Picade Console reviewed

Retro gaming galore: Picade Console reviewed

Following the arrival of a brand new version of the Picade – reviewed in The MagPi #74 – Pimoroni has given the same treatment to the Picade Console. Unlike its bigger brother, this retro gaming machine lacks its own screen, so you need to connect it up to a TV or monitor via HDMI. It does, however, pack an internal speaker so you’ll still get sound even if your monitor doesn’t have any. All you need to add is an HDMI cable, microSD card (with the RetroPie OS on it), and a Raspberry Pi – any 40-pin model will work, but we’d recommend a Pi 3B+ for emulating some of the more powerful retro systems. Putting the Picade Console together The lack of a screen does make the Picade Console a whole lot easier to assemble than the full-size Picade. Made up of five black powder-coated MDF panels (with helpful labels), its ‘cabinet’ is essentially identical to the Picade’s control console section, but with an extra rear cut-out for the Pi’s HDMI port. Assembly instructions are on the back of an A3 poster, or you can use the online ones. It took us around an hour to put together. The panels are connected using plastic brackets and metal M3 nuts and bolts. The only tricky part was reaching in to place the tiny nuts on the side bolts (tip: put a bit of Blu Tack on your finger). For the top section, the supplied artwork (or your own) is sandwiched between the black panel and a clear Perspex one. A microswitched joystick (with ball top) and push-fit arcade buttons are then inserted – or you could customise it with your own, such as Pimoroni’s Plasma buttons (see boxout). Once the mini speaker is fitted, you can mount a Raspberry Pi on the base and add the key part of the system: the new Picade X HAT. Also available separately (£15 / $16) for those who want to build their own custom arcade machine, the HAT has easy-to-use DuPont connectors for the numerous joystick and button wires. The only slight issue with the Picade Console – which is more compact than its original incarnation – is that there’s not a lot of room inside for all the wiring. The Picade X HAT also features a built-in I2S DAC and amplifier for the internal speaker, and power management that allows you to…
Source: Retro gaming galore: Picade Console reviewed