The New Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide: Available With Free Delivery

The New Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide: Available With Free Delivery

Perfect for beginners. Hot off the press, this new 244-page official Raspberry Pi book is crammed with beginner’s guides containing all the information you need to get started using your new Raspberry Pi computer. Learn how to set up the Raspberry Pi, install an operating system and start using it. Code your own animations and games, using both the Scratch and Python languages, and create amazing projects by connecting electronic components to the Pi’s GPIO pins. Plus much, much more. Awe-inspiring projects Set up your Raspberry Pi Learn to code using Scratch and Python Control LEDs, buttons, and sensors Have fun creating awe-inspiring projects! Combining Gareth Halfacree, technology journalist and technical author, and Sam Alder, the illustrator behind Raspberry Pi’s incredible cartoons and animations, this new beginner’s guide is the only resource you need to help you get started with the Raspberry Pi computer. Suitable for ages 7+. Free worldwide shipping Wherever you’re based, enjoy free worldwide shipping when you checkout through the Raspberry Pi Press store. In time for the holidays, why not treat yourself or purchase as a gift? > Click here to view in the store Alternatively, you can read the digital edition here. The post The New Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Guide: Available With Free Delivery appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
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Animal Soundscapes: Monitoring Biodiversity In The Jungle

Animal Soundscapes: Monitoring Biodiversity In The Jungle

Tropical forests are noisy places, the air filled with the sounds of a wide diversity of birds and animals. They are also rather physically taxing thanks to daily thunderstorms, intense midday heat, and mountainous terrain. It makes it difficult for ecologists to perform manual field studies, which are thus prone to a high failure rate. So research postgraduate Sarab Sethi – along with his supervisors Prof Rob Ewers, Dr Nick Jones, and Dr Lorenzo Picanali – have devised a real-time ecosystem monitoring device based around a Raspberry Pi. “Our particular interest was in recording audio to capture the soundscape – or the combination of all the vocalising animals – as this is a rich data source that can be used to track birds, mammals, frogs, and more,” Sarab tells us. For this, the scientists required a device that could continuously record, compress, and upload huge amounts of data from the field while exploiting a patchy mobile signal to remotely transfer data to a server. “The Raspberry Pi was ideal as a low-cost, relatively low-power device with a usable amount of computing power and large support for a wide range of sensors,” says Sarab. This is the view from underneath the solar panel, with everything firmly strapped or taped into place Jungle sounds With their field site in Sabah, Borneo, in mind, they set about creating a system that could monitor the effects of oil palm plantations and logging on the region’s biodiversity by listening out for the sounds of animals. It involved using a Røde smartLav+ microphone to provide high-quality audio recordings, along with an external USB audio card, solar energy, and a 3G dongle to connect to the internet. The ultimate aim is to use artificial intelligence to pick up on the audio and make sense of the data. For now, however, the Python-programmed software runs two threads concurrently: one continuously records data from a sensor and stores it in uncompressed files, and the second compresses this data and robustly uploads it using FTP to a remote server. “It is important that the device is networked to minimise the amount of times a scientist or research assistant has to go to visit the device to manually collect the data – freeing up time to be better spent on other more efficient and less exhausting tasks,” explains Sarab. “Large animals also love to play with (or more likely destroy) any…
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Model Lighthouse built with Raspberry Pi

Model Lighthouse built with Raspberry Pi

When Dave knew that he would be getting married in a unique London lighthouse, he decided to make some very original wedding table centrepieces: working models of the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse in which the nuptials were taking place. Not only that, but he resolved to make ten of them – quite an undertaking. As Dave explains, “With my love of 3D printing, Raspberry Pis, and needlessly complicated projects, recreating the lighthouse as a working model seemed like the way to go.” Trinity Buoy Lighthouse Model: quick facts Trinity Buoy Wharf is the site of London’s only lighthouse The lighthouse model was designed in Autodesk 123D Dave used his Prusa MK2.5 to 3D-print components A jam-jar is used for the glass light casing Dave gave most of the models to wedding guests – one is now in Australia Trinity BuoyLighthouse Buoy oh buoy! Over a three- to four-month period, before his August 2018 wedding, Dave designed, 3D-printed, and completed the models with, unsurprisingly, “the last month being pretty non-stop.” A time-consuming project, modelling the lighthouse necessitated a lot of work, and Dave used many photographs of the real-life lighthouse to guide his progress. In addition, as he explains, “The software I used on the Pi was pretty simple, although I tweaked it a few times. The two most challenging parts were fitting in all the printing time, and the mechanism for the rotating light. I went through a couple of major versions of that, a lot of minor versions, and still never got it 100% reliable – turns out rotating and maintaining a circuit is quite hard!” The 3D printing time was indeed considerable, as each model required 44 hours of printing in order to produce the six key pieces: outer, inner, railing, cap, base, and base lid. In terms of function, the models include an 18650 battery (in a shield), a Raspberry Pi, and an LCD display in the base. At the top is a warm white LED light on top of a stepper motor. “Wires run up the middle and when you turn on the battery, it powers on the light and the Pi,” reveals Dave. “The Pi then starts turning the motor (and light) and displaying various messages on the display.” Concealed in the base are a Pi Zero, battery, motor board, and LCD; the wiring proved challenging Building a model lighthouse Understandably, the project was far…
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Steam Link on Raspberry Pi

Steam Link on Raspberry Pi

Steam Link Raspberry Pis have been something of a dream for many years. While there are DIY, hacky methods to make one, Valve has now released the Steam Link software directly for Raspberry Pi. Steam Link on Raspberry Pi is very important It’s currently in beta, and available right now as a package you can install in Raspbian. Valve recommends using a Raspberry Pi 3 or Raspberry Pi 3B+ for it, and early reports suggest it’s already working extremely well. Pi-based replacement? Gone, but not forgotten It’s interesting timing now that the original Steam Link hardware is being discontinued by Valve. Does it hint towards a software future for their streaming solution? Maybe even a Steam-branded Pi solution? We’ll definitely be keeping an eye on what they do. The post Steam Link on Raspberry Pi appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
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National Centre for Computing: Raspberry Pi in £78m education boost

National Centre for Computing: Raspberry Pi in £78m education boost

Computing education in England is about to get a much-needed jolt of funding with the help of the Raspberry Pi Foundation. The money will found a new National Centre for Computing. The welcome computing cash injection comes a year after The Royal Society reported that there was a ‘once-in-a-generation opportunity’ to transform the way computing is taught in schools and colleges. Commenting on the report, Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Philip Colligan noted that “there’s a long way to go before we can say that young people are consistently getting the computing education they need and deserve in UK schools.” See also: Coolest Projects comes to the UK Pi 3 makes ‘ultimate education list’ for engineers BBC Computer Literacy archive The best Python websites and resources A Royal Society report last November drew attention to the scale of the challenge in transforming the way we teach computer science in the UK Raspberry Pi helps secure £78m for STEM education The Raspberry Pi Foundation is one of the organisations that, jointly, have secured £78 million in UK government funding to make this vision a reality. The Foundation is part of a consortium that also includes STEM Learning and the BCS (British Computer Society). Google has also pledged £1 million to support free online computing and computer science courses accessible to anyone. While existing computing and ICT (information and communications technology) teachers are being directly targeted, the scheme will also upskill existing teachers in other disciplines to teach GCSE Computer Science. Philip explains that the money will be used “to make sure every child in every school in England has access to a world-leading computing education.” Teachers will get resources, training, research, and certification as part of the programme The consortium will found a new National Centre for Computing – with a network of computing hubs where existing primary and secondary school computing teachers in England will be able to take part in fully funded CPD (continuing professional development) courses. Teachers will also have access to free resources enabling them to teach computing to students from Key Stage 1 right up to A-Level. As part of an all-hands-on-deck approach to overhauling computing teaching in England, the Raspberry Pi Foundation and its consortium have more than 60 organisations signed up to offer practical assistance and expertise. Businesses, universities, and non-profit organisations are pooling their expertise and resources to provide the support that educators and schools require. You…
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Raspberry Pi Superguide in The MagPi #76

Raspberry Pi Superguide in The MagPi #76

Improve your Raspberry Pi skills with the Superguide in this month’s edition of The MagPi magazine. Click here to buy The MagPi magazine issue #76. Raspberry Pi Superguide We’re going to take your Raspberry Pi skills up a level. Our Superguide collects all we know about Raspberry Pi in one place. Designed to be the perfect get-going guide for newcomers, and a tool for long-time readers to get better at digital making. Raspberry Pi Superguide The Raspberry Pi 3A+ Get an in-depth look at the Raspberry Pi 3A+, the new $25 computer. It packs the power of a 3B+ into the same footprint of the original Pi A+. We’ve got all the specifications, benchmarks, plus an interview with Eben Upton and Roger Thornton. Nybble: the open-source kitten Discover Nybble, a new quadruped robotic designed to act as a pet and help owners learn advanced robotics. Nybble: the open-source kitten Code Pac-Man Discover how to code your own Pac-Man game using Python and Pygame Zero. Code Pac-Man Hack Smart Lights Use a Raspberry Pi to hack into smart lights and create your own computer-controlled lighting display. It’s fun all year round, and we think it’s especially handy in the run-up to Christmas. Hack Smart Lights The post Raspberry Pi Superguide in The MagPi #76 appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
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Win 1 of 10 signed Raspberry Pi 3A+

Win 1 of 10 signed Raspberry Pi 3A+

The Raspberry Pi 3A+ is the newest Raspberry Pi, packing a significant portion of the power of the 3B+ into a much smaller board. You can read more about it in issue 76, and enter to win one below. Win one of ten signed Raspberry Pi 3A+! https://js.gleam.io/e.js The post Win 1 of 10 signed Raspberry Pi 3A+ appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
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Learn C with these Raspberry Pi resources

Learn C with these Raspberry Pi resources

This article first appeared in The MagPi 74 and was written by Lucy Hattersley Learn to Code with C £3.99/$5 or free PDF download If you want to learn to program C using a Raspberry Pi, then the best place to start is with our official guide. Written by Raspberry Pi’s very own Simon Long, the UX Engineer responsible for creating the Desktop on both Raspbian and Debian, this book is the perfect guide to C on the Raspberry Pi. Simon has been programming with C since the early nineties and has created everything from mobile phones to medical equipment. The result is a compact and practical programmer’s guide, written from direct experience. Starting with Hello World, the book covers everything from basic variables, strings, and arithmetic, through pointers (a subject many find difficult), and right up to file input and output. What’s great about the Essentials Guide is that it’s a pocket-sized guide to the C language, packing in all the basics in 92 pages. Unlike many books on C, which run to thousands of pages, you get all the essential information and very little waffle. Many members of The MagPi team find this book an invaluable reference guide, and keep a copy on hand whenever programming in C. Online C courses C Programming for Beginners Udemy’s course, by Huw Collingbourne, is extremely beginner-friendly and provides easy-to-follow video tutorials. There’s a huge range of content. The RRP is £29.99, but you will periodically find it on sale (at press time it was £10.99). Look out for special offers on Udemy’s beginner-friendly course Programming Paradigms (Stanford) This classic series of lectures by Stanford Professor Jerry Cain can be found on YouTube. The course teaches students how to write several programming languages, including C, and how to understand the programming paradigms behind each language. Introduction to Programming in C This four-week course by Duke University is designed to teach problem-solving with the C programming language. It’s not cheap (a subscription to Coursera is £37 per month), but Coursera certificates are recognised by many companies, so it’s a good option for those looking for a professional qualification. CS50’s Introduction to Computer Science Free Massive open online courses (MOOCs) are online training schemes available for anyone to enrol in. We’re big fans of MITx, but Harvard has hands-down the best introduction to Computer Science with the C programming language. Introduction to Computer Science CS50…
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Free Raspberry Pi 3A+ with a 12-month subscription

Free Raspberry Pi 3A+ with a 12-month subscription

Take out a 12-month subscription to The MagPi magazine and we’ll give you a free Raspberry Pi 3A+ board worth £25. The Raspberry Pi 3A+ is the latest Raspberry Pi computer. It has the a 1.4GHz 64-bit quad-core processor, dual-band wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2/BLE in the same mechanical format as the Raspberry Pi 1 Model A+ Click here to take out a 12-month subscription to The MagPi magazine. Get a free Raspberry Pi 3A+ worth £25 with a 12-month subscription to The MagPi How to get your free Raspberry Pi 3A+ We’ve only got a limited amount of Raspberry Pi 3A+ boards, so if you want to get a free Raspberry Pi 3A+ be sure to snap up a subscription soon. Click here to visit The Raspberry Pi Press Store Choose your Location Click Add to Cart The free Raspberry Pi 3A+ will be added to your cart alongside the 12-month subscription. Click Check Out and enter your email, and shipping address. Complete the purchase and we will ship you a Raspberry Pi 3A+ and an issue of The MagPi. You’ll get 12 copies of The MagPi magazine in total. One every month as it is released. The offer replaces our usual free Pi Zero W and Official Case. Once we have run out of Raspberry Pi 3A+ we will revert to our usual (and still amazing) offer of a free Pi Zero W. More importantly. You’ll get the next 12 issues of The MagPi magazine delivered directly to your door. The MagPi  magazine has inspirational projects from the maker community, and incredible tutorials that teach you coding, electronics and maker skills. The Raspberry Pi 3A+ board What is a Raspberry Pi 3A+? The Raspberry Pi 3A+ is the latest single board computer (SBC) from Raspberry Pi. It’s a low-cost computer used by digital makers, computer enthusiasts and students of all ages. With a Raspberry Pi 3A+ you can run Raspbian (the official OS) based on Debian Linux. Or you can run a range of different operating systems. The Raspberry Pi can be programmed, and the GPIO (General Purpose Input/Output) pins enable it to control, and respond to, electronic components. You can turn the Raspberry Pi into almost anything. A media player, music system, retro gaming console, a magic mirror, smart speaker, just use it as an extremely versatile home computer. It’s easy to use, and The MagPi features regular…
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Black Friday: 50% off Raspberry Pi Press, free delivery, special offers!

Black Friday: 50% off Raspberry Pi Press, free delivery, special offers!

Raspberry Pi fans should take a look at the Raspberry Pi Press store for some great deals on books, back issues of The MagPi, and Essentials Guides. We think our books and magazines are always great value, but today you can get an even better deal on lots of Raspberry Pi Press items. You can currently get up to 50% off copies of The MagPi magazine and HackSpace magazine, plus a great range of other deals and offers. Order two of the 2019 project books in any combination and receive 50% off the second book of your choice. Mix it up with one of each, or buy two of the same. Why not keep one and gift one? Discounts will be automatically applied during checkout… Half-price The MagPi and HackSpace magazines Here are just some of the things you’ll currently find on the Raspberry Pi Press store: Half-price: The MagPi, Hackspace. Readers can currently pick up all available issues of The MagPi magazine, and back-issues of HackSpace for just £2.99 (half the usual store price). 2019 Project Books: Buy one, get one half-price. Buy The Official Raspberry Pi Projects Book Volume 4 and get The Book of Making for half-price. Free Essentials Guide with Beginner’s Book. Buy The Official Raspberry Pi Beginner’s Book (with Pi Zero W included) and get any Essentials Guide of your choosing. This is a great Christmas gift! Add both to your cart and enter the code FREEBOOK during checkout. Buy The Beginner’s Book and get an Essentials Guide free Plus! Raspberry Pi Press is currently offering FREE shipping on all orders over £50. Automatically applied during checkout. There’s never been a better time to pick up a copy of The MagPi magazine, or fill out your collection of back issues. Projects Book V4 and Book of Making: buy one get one half-price Buy Raspberry Pi Projects Book and get Book of Making half price The post Black Friday: 50% off Raspberry Pi Press, free delivery, special offers! appeared first on The MagPi Magazine.
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