Spookiest Raspberry Pi Halloween projects – part one

Spookiest Raspberry Pi Halloween projects – part one

Gather round, ghouls and girls, it’s that time of the year again when scary rules supreme. Perhaps you’re planning on dressing up to go trick-or-treating or marathoning a ghastly amount of horror films, but we’ve found some people who are deep in their lairs experimenting with a Raspberry Pi to create the spookiest projects the world has ever seen. We’ve hunted down the most horrifying and wicked projects for your reading pleasure, but don’t worry, the only dark art at work here is the odd bit of C programming. Beware, read any further and you’ll be doomed to be inspired by these seven unholy projects… and have to read many more awful puns. The full article can be found in The MagPi 38 We’ll be rating these projects using the all-knowing MagPi SPOOK-O-METER Raspberry Pi Haunted House Enter if you dare to the abode with home scare-tomation Maker: Stewart Watkiss – data centre manager, father, part-time Count Dracula It’s late. The night grows dark and you’re near the end of your trick-or-treat run – but what’s this? A house you’ve never seen before on your road. Eager for more sweets, you make your way to the door. A haunted house sign greets you, but you think it merely decoration. Approaching the door, you press the doorbell – only for glass to break and the light to go out. A door creaks, the sign you had dismissed flashes, and you hear screams as the lights come back on. Startled, you look to your right and realise monsters are partying in the garage next to you, celebrating another victim in their night of ghastly fun. What horrors await inside? “I had been trying to think of something fun to do for Halloween and the Raspberry Pi was an obvious choice,” the owner of this nightmarish house, Stewart, tells us. “I’d recently built a circuit for home automation using remote-control sockets and had the idea of using that to turn lights on and off automatically. I also spent some time looking around at shops to see what other Halloween props I could add to the project.” The system is deceptively simple, although there’s a lot of different components to it. A dedicated doorbell is hooked up to a PiFace board that interacts directly with the Raspberry Pi and some Python code. Stewart chose the PiFace for this, instead of wiring up directly to…
Source: Spookiest Raspberry Pi Halloween projects – part one

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