Voyagers Review

Voyagers Review

Voyagers premieres in theaters on Friday, April 9. Read more on IGN’s policy on movie reviews in light of COVID-19 here. IGN strongly encourages anyone considering going to a movie theater during the COVID-19 pandemic to check their local public health and safety guidelines before buying a ticket. [poilib element=”accentDivider”] Set aboard a starship run by a crew of genius teens who won’t live long enough to see their destination, Voyagers — which is touted more broadly as “Lord of the Flies in Space” — is a sci-fi thought experiment that, at times, is too obvious and on-the-nose for its own good. Written and directed by Neil Burger (Divergent, Limitless), Voyagers has the makings of a well-meaning message all burrito’d up in a science-fiction casing, a time-honored trick of the genre, but it also has the trappings of a project that doesn’t know when to hold back and trust its audience enough to work out some of the ethical equations for themselves. Yes, despite an intriguing concept, and solid performances from its young cast (plus an errant Colin Farrell), the film is too blatant with its themes and, because of that, too safe with its payout. An allegory this thinly-veiled maybe should have gone even further, and been even harsher, with its story and not played things as safe as it does. Tye Sheridan (X-Men franchise, Ready Player One) and Lily-Rose Depp (Yoga Hosers, The King) capably lead a cast of young performers meant to represent humanity’s last hope. Fionn Whitehead, as Zac, is the crew’s wild card who embodies our base and undisciplined desires while Game of Thrones’ Isaac Hempstead Wright – er – curiously vanishes from the film, it seems, halfway through. Regardless, the ensemble, which also features Farrell as the adult chaperone of the group, is nicely set up as a bomb with a rather lengthy fuse. The question then becomes, onboard a sterile ship that’s designed to be aesthetically muted and blandly functional, what will light said fuse and send everyone spiraling? [ignvideo url=”https://www.ign.com/videos/2021/03/02/voyagers-official-trailer”] We’ve seen sci-fi, and other genres, tackle the idea of starter societies. Stories that study the ins and outs of what ultimately goes wrong when the best-laid plans feel rather foolproof. What is it about our species that steers us toward ruin, even in the midst of a utopia? Voyagers, however, adds an extra layer to this ancient puzzle by giving us a…
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