The Chicago 7: Where Are They Now?

The Chicago 7: Where Are They Now?

Netflix’s The Trial of the Chicago 7 revisits one of the most notorious American trials of the 20th Century, as retold by The Social Network and The West Wing’s Aaron Sorkin. Featuring a stellar ensemble cast, we said “Aaron Sorkin has produced a thoughtful meditation on a truly nightmarish event, a Kafka-esque distortion of due process” in our Trial of the Chicago 7 review. But while the drama chronicles the lives of the defendants during their legal battle, Sorkin’s film doesn’t engage in the traditional “where are they now/what happened to them after” sort of coda we’ve come to expect from such “based on a true story” films. There are only passing mentions of the fates of some of the people portrayed in the film. So with that in mind, and to satiate the curiosity of those who have just finished watching the film, let’s dive into what happened to the leading characters depicted in The Trial of the Chicago 7. [widget path=”global/article/imagegallery” parameters=”albumSlug=chicago-7-where-are-they-now&captions=true”] Abbie Hoffman (played by Sacha Baron Cohen) Hoffman remained an activist for the rest of his life, authoring Steal This Book, which he dubbed “a handbook for living free, stealing and making violent revolution.” Heeding the book’s title, enough people stole the book that many stores stopped carrying it. Hoffman was arrested in 1973 for intent to sell and distribute cocaine. He claimed he was entrapped by an undercover officer and went on the run for several years, during which time he abandoned his family and even had plastic surgery to alter his appearance. Hoffman eventually served four months of a one-year prison sentence. He later returned to activism and made a cameo as a protestor in Oliver Stone’s 1989 film Born on the Fourth of July. Hoffman, who had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder, died at age 52 in April 1989 from what was officially ruled a suicide by phenobarbital overdose. Hoffman’s suicide has many doubters, including fellow Chicago 7 member David Dellinger, as Hoffman would regularly lecture on how the CIA disguised their assassinations as suicides. Jerry Rubin (played by Jeremy Strong) After leaving political activism, Rubin became a multimillionaire businessman and even invested in Apple Computer in its early days. Rubin and Hoffman debated each other on a tour touted as “Yippie versus Yuppie,” with Rubin advocating for wealth creation and social consciousness in business. He was also critical of the excesses of…
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