How The Dark Tower Multiverse Connects to Stephen King's Other Work

How The Dark Tower Multiverse Connects to Stephen King's Other Work

With so many people working from home and practicing social distancing in 2020, we could all use plenty of distractions. It’s hard to go wrong with a good Stephen King book. King has built a career writing spooky page-turners that frequently clock in at over 1000 pages. Just one of his books can sustain most readers for days. His entire back catalog could take months or more. For the budding King fan, perhaps the easiest way to take in the best and most important books of his prolific career is to focus on the Dark Tower saga. In addition to the seven core novels that make up the story of wandering gunslinger Roland Deschain, many of King’s most iconic books tie into the Dark Tower in some way or another, forming an entire literary multiverse. Read on to learn which books you should read to fully appreciate the Dark Tower mythos. Warning: Very vague spoilers follow about certain connections between books. [widget path=”global/article/imagegallery” parameters=”albumSlug=the-essentials-stephen-kings-dark-tower-multiverse&captions=true”] [poilib element=”accentDivider”] Stephen King’s Dark Tower Series: Book Reading Order Much like with the Star Wars movies, Stephen King fans frequently debate the best order in which to read his Dark Tower-related books. While the core Dark Tower books are numbered sequentially, it can be much harder to know when and where to branch out to the rest of King’s work. We’re proponents of reading these books in more or less the same order they’re published. The Dark Tower is a story that grew in the telling. King certainly didn’t have any inkling of the full scope of this story when he began it, or how much events in his own life would influence its execution, and it’s best appreciated with that perspective in mind. Salem’s Lot (1975) Salem’s Lot is King’s second published novel, and after all these years it remains one of his best and most terrifying works. It certainly set the tone for much of King’s work to come, focusing equally on supernatural horror and the ordinary, mundane evil that lurks behind closed doors. It’s a story that steadily builds a sense of dread as an intrepid few try to save their idyllic small town from being overrun by vampires. Salem’s Lot eventually pays off in a significant way where the Dark Tower books are concerned. One character in particular, Father Callahan, has a big part to play later in the series. The…
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