Museum in a Box

Museum in a Box

You can visit Hoa Hakananai’a at the British Museum, London. A Moai, you’d likely recognise him as one of the Easter Island statues. He’s 2.4 metres in height, nearly a metre wide, and is estimated to weigh around four tonnes. He sits on a high plinth surrounded by text regarding both his own history and that of his fellow Moai and it’s fair to say that, unless you can go to the British Museum in person, you’re unlikely to see him visiting your local museum, school, or library on loan. Museum in a Box is one of the entries in our Top 75 Projects community vote! Now imagine holding a smaller version of Hoa Hakananai’a in your hand. He fits perfectly on your palm and allows you to feel the texture of his surface and the shape of his features. You can pass him around, reposition him, and even drop him if you lose your grip. And as you ‘boop’ him on the top of the Museum in a Box’s Raspberry Pi-powered ‘brain’, he starts to tell you the story of his sea voyage from Easter Island, of the history of his creators, and his first encounter with the explorer Captain Cook in 1774. This pack is the statues of women in London, and includes Virginia Woolf recordings Bonding with history This idea of forming stronger connections with objects through touch and sound is the heart of the Museum in a Box objective. Through 3D-printed models and wooden sculptures, 2D images such as postcards and photographs, and ‘do it yourself’ feedback cards, the team aim to break the disappointing, yet often necessary, Do Not Touch stigma of museums, allowing everyone the chance to get to grips with a history they may otherwise miss out on. On the technical side of the project, the Museum in a Box consists of a wooden box ‘brain’ that houses a Raspberry Pi and RFID reader. There’s also a volume control for playback and lights to indicate when the unit is powered and functional. Each object, whether it be 3D or flat, is kitted out with its own unique RFID tag. When placed upon the box, the tag is read by the reader beneath the surface and informs the Raspberry Pi to play back the appropriate sound file via a built-in speaker system. The sound files vary from object to object. Some play music, such…
Source: Museum in a Box

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